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Summary

Public diplomacy is increasingly facilitated through social media. Government leaders and diplomats are using social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to communicate with foreign publics, changing the dynamics of interaction between broadcaster and audience. The key to understanding the power of social media in public diplomacy is the role of emotion in digital diplomacy strategies: social media statements relating to state identity can incite strong emotions that have the potential to undermine heretofore positive diplomatic relations, or provide communicative openings that move towards ameliorating crises. Examining the interaction of social media, emotion and identity provides insight into the increasing importance of digital diplomacy and the future challenges relating to digital disinformation that lie ahead.

In: Debating Public Diplomacy

Summary

Public diplomacy is increasingly facilitated through social media. Government leaders and diplomats are using social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to communicate with foreign publics, changing the dynamics of interaction between broadcaster and audience. The key to understanding the power of social media in public diplomacy is the role of emotion in digital diplomacy strategies: social media statements relating to state identity can incite strong emotions that have the potential to undermine heretofore positive diplomatic relations, or provide communicative openings that move towards ameliorating crises. Examining the interaction of social media, emotion and identity provides insight into the increasing importance of digital diplomacy and the future challenges relating to digital disinformation that lie ahead.

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In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Summary

This article introduces the special issue on digital disruption in diplomacy. We propose a new research agenda, advancing novel conceptualisations and empirical insights into the hybrid nature of contemporary diplomatic practices in a broad range of areas such as peace-making, inter-state signalling, domestic politics, digital communication, public diplomacy and popular culture. Emphasising the major impact of new technologies and the convergence of offline and online diplomatic space, we address the transformative influence at both the micro level of individual actors and the macro level of diplomatic processes and structures. By taking stock of the existing digital diplomacy literature and exploring emerging digital technologies, diplomatic signalling and digital disinformation, we show how new research on digital disruption in diplomacy may be advanced by focusing on agency-structure, method and data collection. Finally, we provide an overview of contributions that collectively propel the development of a new explorative research agenda on digital disruption in diplomacy.

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In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy