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Abstract

The year 1955 was most productive for scrolls research. Sukenik's English edition of the Hebrew University scrolls was published. Burrows published his best-selling book on the scrolls. The first order of business at the Palestine Archaeological Museum in 1955 was the completion of preparations for the publication of the Cave 1 fragments. On 29 January Harding had written to Kraeling about a new discovery of one fairly large scroll. On 8 February 1955 Harding received a letter from A. Grohmann in Egypt, who planned to come to Jerusalem to work on some inscriptions at the expense of the museum. The first confirmation that a new purchase of Cave 4 manuscripts had been bought came in a letter from Strugnell to Allegro, 13 December 1955.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History

Abstract

By the beginning of 1949 all the major scrolls had been bought or taken out of the country. Israel's War of Independence had come to a halt with an uneasy cease-fire and, Transjordan, later known as the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, had control of Qumran, East Jerusalem, The Old City, and Mt. Scopus, including the campus of the Hebrew University. Stephen Pfann suggested that the traditional Cave 1 had been authenticated by fragments discovered by Gerald Lankester Harding and Father Roland de Vaux in their excavation in 1949 belonging to at least one of the first seven scrolls. The chapter also provides the reasons on why Cave 1 continues to be a mystery such as: (1) there are two basically different stories about how the first cave was entered; and (2) the official excavation found fragments from Sukenik's scrolls only.

In: The Dead Sea Scrolls, A Full History