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This book summarizes what is actually known about the biology of Leaf Beetles. It is the most recent study in the field.
As we are well aware, Chrysomelidae, one of the three largest families of beetles, are of great economic importance since they can be a serious pest to crops or, on the other hand, can be used to destroy imported weeds. This is due to the selectivity of their feeding preferences. In this way, Chrysomelidae are an invaluable tool for studying plant selection mechanisms.
The many and varied topics dealt with in this book cover almost all aspects of phylogeny, classification, paleontology, parasitology, biogeography, defenses, population biology, genetics and biological control as well as many other subjects. The most renowned specialists in these fields have been chosen to put together a diverse, state-of-the-art publication.
Few beetle families have been studied in such detail as the Chrysomelids. This is not only due to their economic importance, but also to their incredible variety of forms and behaviors. There are no less than 40,000 species currently in existence worldwide, but probably 100,000 species have existed since the Jurassic, when they first came into being with the Cycadoids and other primitive plant families, later to diversify during the Cretaceous with the advent of flowering plants.
There are an estimated 40,000 species of chrysomelids, or leaf beetles, worldwide. These biologically interesting and often colorful organisms, such as the tortoise beetles, have a broad range of life histories and fascinating adaptations. For example, there are chrysomelids with shortened wings (brachypterous) and elytra (brachelytrous), other species are viviparous, and yet other leaf beetles have complicated anti predator-parasitoid defenses. Some species, such as corn rootworms (several species in the genus Diabrotica) constitute major agricultural crop pests. Research on Chrysomelidae 2 is a the second volume of a series of volumes on the Chrysomelidae edited by Jolivet, Santiago-Blay, and Schmitt.
There are an estimated 40,000 species of chrysomelids, or leaf beetles, worldwide. These biologically interesting and often colorful organisms, such as the tortoise beetles, have a broad range of life histories and fascinating adaptations. For example, there are chrysomelids with shortened wings (brachypterous) and elytra (brachelytrous), other species are viviparous, and yet other leaf beetles have complicated anti predator-parasitoid defenses. Some species, such as corn rootworms (several species in the genus Diabrotica) constitute major agricultural crop pests. Research on Chrysomelidae 1 is a the first of an intended series of volumes on the Chrysomelidae edited by Jolivet, Santiago-Blay, and Schmitt.
There are an estimated 40,000 species of chrysomelids, or leaf beetles, worldwide. These biologically interesting and often colorful organisms, such as the tortoise beetles, have a broad range of life histories and fascinating adaptations. For example, there are chrysomelids with shortened wings (brachypterous) and elytra (brachelytrous), other species are viviparous, and yet other leaf beetles have complicated anti predator-parasitoid defenses. Some species, such as corn rootworms (several species in the genus Diabrotica) constitute major agricultural crop pests. Research on Chrysomelidae 1 is a the first of an intended series of volumes on the Chrysomelidae edited by Jolivet, Santiago-Blay, and Schmitt.
Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber
Insects are the most diverse group of life on Earth and their history extends well into the Paleozoic, making them among the oldest of terrestrial animal lineages. They are critical to the well being of ecosystems from the equator to the poles, and are inexorably tied to the well being of our world. Whether beneficial or malignant, insects wield an overwhelming influence on our health, economy, and security. It is little wonder that insects so consistently appear in our cultures, religions, and mythologies. Given such realities, it is vital that we gain a better understanding and appreciation of Nature’s ‘inordinate fondness’. Indeed, there is considerable wisdom to be found in the study of these marvels of evolution, and what better way to understand their present and future than to peer back into their distant past.
Here presented are some of the results of the 6th International Congress on Fossil Insects, Arthropods and Amber (FossilX3) held in Byblos, Lebanon in April, 2013. In the tradition of previous congresses, researchers from around the world gathered to discuss the latest developments and to build new co-operative endeavours. Recognizing that the future of our science is one of interdisciplinary collaboration, these meetings steadily grow in importance, and proceedings such as this reveal the latest hypotheses and conclusions, while inspiring others toward newer and greater goals.