Search Results

No Access

Series:

Edited by David Durand-Guédy

For nearly a millennium, a large part of Asia was ruled by Turkic or Mongol dynasties of nomadic origin. What was the attitude of these dynasties towards the many cities they controlled, some of which were of considerable size? To what extent did they live like their subjects? How did they evolve? Turko-Mongol Rulers, Cities and City-life aims to broaden the perspective on the issue of location of rule in this particular context by bringing together specialists in various periods, from pre-Chingissid Eurasia to nineteenth-century Iran, and of various disciplines (history, archaeology, history of art).
Contributors include: Michal Biran, David Durand-Guédy, Kurt Franz, Peter Golden, Minoru Inaba, Nobuaki Kondo, Yuri Karev, Tomoko Masuya, Charles Melville, Jürgen Paul and Andrew Peacock

Durand-Guédy, David

Durand-Guédy, David

Durand-Guédy, David

No Access

David Durand-Guédy

Abstract

This article discusses the origin of the Persian word ḫargāh, which is used by medieval authors to speak of the trellis tent (yurt). It argues that the word xrγ’xh found in the Sogdian text P.3 written in pre-Samanid Central Asia refer to the same object. It also builds a case for a local origin of the word, and a probable link with kërëkü, the Turkic word referring to the same type of tent.

No Access

David Durand-Guédy

Abstract

This article deals with the history of Isfahan during the five centuries between the arrival of the Turks and the beginning of the Safavid period. It attempts to identify the continuities and ruptures from three different perspectives: To what extent can we speak of an urban decline? What was the relationship of the Isfahanis with the imperial rulers? How did the general context impact the makeup and the organisation of the society? It appears that Isfahan demonstrated remarkable resilience over the period, and that it is only beginning with the Timurid period that we can speak of a decline. Likewise, there is remarkable continuity in the ways in which the local elites collaborated with or resisted the imperial players. The role of the Ṣāʿid family, which held the cadial function over four centuries, is emblematic in this respect. Conversely, under special circumstances, the imperial players were able to exert great substantial influence on the local communities, and it is this political backing which explains the strengthening of the Hanafis in the sixth/twelfth century, and that of the Shiis in the following. One of the main accomplishments of this synthesis view of Isfahan history is that it assesses the effects of the Mongol domination relative to that of other periods.

No Access

David Durand-Guédy, Roy P. Mottahedeh and Jürgen Paul