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In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Ocean Law and Policy

Abstract

This article summarizes U.S. State practice in the area of maritime enforcement. Focusing on the activities of the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy, the article covers law enforcement for piracy and human trafficking, law enforcement for maritime terrorism and weapon trafficking, enforcement against illegal extraction of living marine resources, enforcement to protect the marine environment from pollution, enforcement to prevent accidents at sea, customs and illegal immigration enforcement, and drug trafficking enforcement. The article notes that the U.S. approach to maritime enforcement has been a “long-arm” approach ensuring enforcement of U.S. interests spanning oceanic regions.

In: The Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law

Abstract

This article provides a review of the major “historic rights” cases in United States federal jurisprudence involving disputes between the United States and its constituent states. On the basis of these cases, the article describes the three step-approach taken by the judiciary in deciding whether there are cognizable “historic right” claims.

In: The Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law
There is an ever-present threat of catastrophic marine pollution incidents, as illustrated by recent disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Even small-scale accidental pollution discharges can have long-term consequences for marine and coastal resources. The UN Convention on the Law of Sea obliges all States to cooperate to prevent accidents and to minimize environmental damage during emergencies by jointly developing and implementing marine pollution contingency plans. The Asia-Pacific is one of the world’s busiest shipping regions, some of its mega-ports experience high rates of vessel congestion, and there are increasing numbers of offshore installations. Marine pollution prevention planning is thus vital for the region. Marine Pollution Contingency Planning: State Practice in Asia-Pacific States outlines and examines marine pollution contingency planning in Australia, Canada, China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Philippines, Singapore, and the United States.
In: Freedom of Navigation and Globalization
In: Marine Pollution Contingency Planning
In: Marine Pollution Contingency Planning
In: Ocean Law Debates