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Global: MOOCs as Neocolonialism: Who Controls Knowledge?

International Higher Education, Spring 2014, Number 75

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Philip G. Altbach

Global: Corruption: A Key Challenge to Internationalization

International Higher Education, Fall 2012, Number 69

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Philip G. Altbach

Global: Student Activism Remains a Potent Force Worldwide

International Higher Education, Summer 2014, Number 76

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Philip G. Altbach and Manja Klemenčič

Global: Another Week, Another Scandal: Immigration Dilemmas and Political Confusion

International Higher Education, Winter 2013, Number 70

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Philip G. Altbach and Liz Reisberg

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Philip G. Altbach and Patti McGill Peterson

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Philip G. Altbach and Patti McGill Peterson

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Philip G. Altbach and Daniel C. Levy

Kara A. Godwin and Philip G. Altbach

Debates about higher education’s purpose have long been polarized between specialized preparation for specific vocations and a broad, general knowledge foundation known as liberal education. Excluding the United States, specialized curricula have been the dominant global norm. Yet, quite surprisingly given this enduring trend, liberal education has new salience in higher education worldwide. This discussion presents liberal education’s non-Western, Western, and u.s. historical roots as a backdrop for discussing its contemporary global resurgence. Analysis from the Global Liberal Education Inventory provides an overview of liberal education’s renewed presence in each of the regions and speculation about its future development.

Private Higher Education

A Global Revolution

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Edited by Philip G. Altbach and Daniel C. Levy

Several decades ago, private higher education already ranked as a major force in the higher education realm in many countries. Expansion in Latin America had begun in the 1960s, and the private sector was dominant in several key East Asian nations. At that stage, the forces shaping higher education were relatively stable. Then, in the last quarter of the 20th century, the dynamics changed dramatically, and private higher education has suddenly become the fastest-growing segment of higher education worldwide-expanding rapidly in almost all parts of the world. This book helps to highlight trends and realities of private higher education around the world. We have organized the book into two sections. The first deals with international trends and issues, while the second-much longer-section focuses on countries and regions. The majorityof the book’s chapters concentrate on single countries. Authors have written from their own points of view. Some are critical of private higher education development, others express praise, whereas most offer objective observation and analysis. All are united in the belief that this phenomenon is a centrally important aspect of higher education-and one that will continue to expand.

Higher Education in the New Century

Global Challenges and Innovative Ideas

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Edited by Philip G. Altbach and Patti McGill Peterson

Higher education worldwide faces similar challenges—how to cope with globalization, the provision of access to underserved populations, and others. Higher Education in the New Century has identified six key challenges and has focused careful analysis on them. The topics are:
* The academic profession
* Access and equity
* Higher education and social cohesion
* Private higher education
* International student circulation
* The research university
Each of these themes is analyzed by a group of international scholars in order to provide a multidisciplinary and cross-national perspective. This book stems from the Fulbright New Century Scholars Program—an international research project involving more than 20 countries. Because of its broad perspective, this book brings a fresh analysis to central issues. For example, the analysis of how universities can contribute to social cohesion in divided societies is unique. International student flows are discussed from a south-south perspective.