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Abstract

This study addresses the issue of v. 15 in 1 Cor 11:2-16 from the perspective of a veiling custom. If veiling is in view (the position adopted here), then how does one confront the difficulty of reconciling the overall context with the exceptional statement in v. 15 that long hair for a woman is a glory. If, as the text argues, long hair is to be taken as a “glory,” by what logic could a woman understand that she should place a veil upon her head? This article provides a way out of the dilemma by showing how a veil can serve the double function of reflecting the hair’s beauty while at the same time preserving a symbol of female modesty.

In: Novum Testamentum

Abstract

This article considers the appropriate translation of πάρεσις in Romans 3:25, which is the only attestation of the word in the Greek Bible. The author argues that “incapacitation” should be considered as an appropriate translation based on the use of the term in other authors of the Hellenistic period, especially the medical writer Aretaeus of Cappadocia. Although some have mentioned “paralysis” as a possible meaning of πάρεσις in scholarly articles and monographs, no one has given serious consideration to understanding the term in this way or how such an understanding might align with Paul’s larger argument.

In: Novum Testamentum
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity
In: Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity