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  • Author or Editor: Anastasia Telesetsky x
  • Comparative Law x
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After the disastrous collapse of the groundfish fisheries in California, fishermen from a number of California coastal communities were prepared to try something different to secure their livelihoods. With the support of a multinational non-governmental organization (ngo), these fishermen committed to sharing previously proprietary information, implementing conservation practices, and pooling quota. This article queries what lessons there might be for Asia-Pacific coastal community fisheries from the “California coastal model.” The article proposes three lessons: (1) ngo investments can change the long-term viability of a fishery (2) local fishery management by a group that identifies itself as a community may be effective for fisheries recovery; and (3) community or group quotas and rights can support sustainability objectives.

In: The Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law

Abstract

This article provides a review of the major “historic rights” cases in United States federal jurisprudence involving disputes between the United States and its constituent states. On the basis of these cases, the article describes the three step-approach taken by the judiciary in deciding whether there are cognizable “historic right” claims.

In: The Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law

Abstract

This article summarizes U.S. State practice in the area of maritime enforcement. Focusing on the activities of the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy, the article covers law enforcement for piracy and human trafficking, law enforcement for maritime terrorism and weapon trafficking, enforcement against illegal extraction of living marine resources, enforcement to protect the marine environment from pollution, enforcement to prevent accidents at sea, customs and illegal immigration enforcement, and drug trafficking enforcement. The article notes that the U.S. approach to maritime enforcement has been a “long-arm” approach ensuring enforcement of U.S. interests spanning oceanic regions.

In: The Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law