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Author: Jan Klabbers
Whether or not a certain norm is legally binding upon international actors may often depend on whether or not the instrument which contains the norm is to be regarded as a treaty. In this study, the author argues that instruments which contain commitments are, ex hypothesi, treaties. In doing so, he challenges popular notions proclaiming the existence of morally and politically binding agreements and so-called `soft law'. Such notions, Klabbers argues, are internally inconsistent and founded upon untenable presumptions. Moreover, they find little support in the pertinent decisions of municipal and international courts and tribunals.
The book addresses issues of importance not only for academics working in international law, constitutional law and political science, but also for practitioners involved in the making, implementation and enforcement of international agreements.
Editors: Jan Klabbers and Katja Creutz
Despite its Finnish pedigree, the Finnish Yearbook of International Law does not restrict itself to purely 'Finnish' topics. On the contrary, it reflects the many connections in law between the national and the international. The Finnish Yearbook of International Law annually publishes articles of high quality dealing with all aspects of international law, including international law aspects of European law, with close attention to developments that affect Finland. It offers: longer articles of a theoretical nature; new avenues and approaches; shorter polemics; commentaries on current international law developments; book reviews; and documentation of relevance to Finland's foreign relations not easily available elsewhere. The Finnish Yearbook offers a fertile ground for the expression of and reflection on the connections between Finnish law and international law as a whole and insight into the richness of this interaction.
Editors: Jan Klabbers and Katja Creutz
Despite its Finnish pedigree, the Finnish Yearbook of International Law does not restrict itself to purely 'Finnish' topics. On the contrary, it reflects the many connections in law between the national and the international. The Finnish Yearbook of International Law annually publishes articles of high quality dealing with all aspects of international law, including international law aspects of European law, with close attention to developments that affect Finland. It offers: longer articles of a theoretical nature; new avenues and approaches; shorter polemics; commentaries on current international law developments; book reviews; and documentation of relevance to Finland's foreign relations not easily available elsewhere. The Finnish Yearbook offers a fertile ground for the expression of and reflection on the connections between Finnish law and international law as a whole and insight into the richness of this interaction.
Editors: Jan Klabbers and Taina Tuori
Despite its Finnish pedigree, the Finnish Yearbook of International Law does not restrict itself to purely 'Finnish' topics. On the contrary, it reflects the many connections in law between the national and the international. The Finnish Yearbook of International Law annually publishes articles of high quality dealing with all aspects of international law, including international law aspects of European law, with close attention to developments that affect Finland. It offers: longer articles of a theoretical nature; new avenues and approaches; shorter polemics; commentaries on current international law developments; book reviews; and documentation of relevance to Finland's foreign relations not easily available elsewhere. The Finnish Yearbook offers a fertile ground for the expression of and reflection on the connections between Finnish law and international law as a whole and insight into the richness of this interaction.
Editors: Jan Klabbers and Taina Tuori
A Collection of Essays in Honour of Bert Vierdag
This focused collection of essays on various aspects of the law of treaties does justice to its honoree, scholar and author Professor Bert E.W. Vierdag, on the occasion of his retirement as Professor of International Law and International Relations at the University of Amsterdam. Written by leading academics in the field as well as practitioners and former practitioners, the essays cover: - the alignment of treaties with more general sources doctrine, addressing such issues as conflicts between various types of treaties and the relationship between treaties and customary international law, and between treaties and domestic law; - the emergence of treaty norms through various ways and methods; and - the creation of treaty law in several branches of international law. This cohesive, focused, expert work will assist and appeal to both academics in the fields of public law and political science and professionals engaged in international negotiations and treaty-making.
The purpose of this unique book is to outline the core of game science by presenting principles underlying the design and use of games and simulations. Game science covers three levels of discourse: the philosophy of science level, the science level, and the application or practical level. The framework presented will help to grasp the interplay between forms of knowledge and knowledge content, interplay that evolves through the action of the players.
Few scientists have witnessed such a radical change in their area of research and practice as those who engaged in play and gaming since the 1950s. Since that time game scientists from a whole variety of disciplines started adopting gaming and simulation methods in their research. Rapid advances in information technology and computer science are producing a tool rich environment for the design and use of games, and for humanities studies of games as digital arts and interactive narratives. Game science is advancing through these waves of change, driven by the digital computer game industry, enhanced through computer and information science, as well as through advances in professional gaming such as in education, public and business management, policy development, health care, eco-systems management, and so on.
When asking game scientists about the core of their science, one should expect to hear diverging answers. The common questions about the core of game and play are not new. They refer to: What is the meaning of game and play? What is real and what is virtual reality? How could we build simple and effective games from complex social systems? Are we able to bring forward a general theory of games? Are we able to help players (social actors) to find smart solutions and approaches to complex issues? How do games enhance learning and how do they improve our thinking capacity and action repertoire?
Current answers to these questions are scattered and inadequate. This book offers a frame-of-reference that will enlighten the characteristics of particular games and simulations from a common perspective. The author pays less attention to instrumental reasoning than on theoretical and methodological questions. Answers will provide a suitable context for addressing design science and analytical science approaches to artifact design and assessment, and theory development and testing. Due to the high diversity of approaches that game science has to accommodate the author chooses an interdisciplinary and where appropriate a meta-disciplinary approach.
The Finnish Yearbook of International Law aspires to honour and strengthen the Finnish tradition in international legal scholarship. Open to contributions from all over the world and from all persuasions, the Finnish Yearbook stands out as a forum for theoretically informed, high-quality publications on all aspects of public international law, including the international relations law of the European Union.

The Finnish Yearbook publishes in-depth articles and shorter notes, commentaries on current developments, book reviews, and relevant overviews of Finland’s state practice. While firmly grounded in traditional legal scholarship, it is open for new approaches to international law and for work of an interdisciplinary nature.
on behalf of: Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Germany; T.M.C. Asser Institute, The Netherlands; Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights, Finland
The Pilot Project of the Council of Europe on State Practice regarding State Succession and Issues of Recognition carried out under the aegis of the Ad Hoc Committee of Legal Advisers on Public International Law (CAHDI) encompasses the practice of sixteen member States of the Council of Europe and provides significant information about these States' position vis-à-vis the new European architecture following the developments of 1989.
On the basis of the information gathered, the CAHDI decided on the preparation of a report by the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, the T.M.C. Asser Institute and the Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights.
With this report the Council of Europe wishes to contribute in a practical manner to the celebration of the United Nations Decade of International Law (1989-1999) and to facilitate the understanding of how States can help to build a stable and peaceful international community by paving the way for the progressive development of international law in this area.

Le Projet pilote du Conseil de l'Europe concernant la pratique des Etats relative à la succession d'Etats et les questions de reconnaissance, mis en oeuvre sous l'égide du Comité ad hoc des conseillers juridiques sur le droit international public (CAHDI) renferme la pratique de seize Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe et apporte des informations importantes sur la position de ces Etats vis-à-vis de la nouvelle architecture européenne qui a suivi les développements de 1989.
Sur la base de l'information rassemblée, le CAHDI a décidé la préparation d'un rapport par l'Institut Max Planck de Droit public comparé et de Droit international, l'Institut T.M.C. Asser et l'Institut Erik Castrén de droit international et des droits de l'homme.
Avec ce rapport le Conseil de l'Europe souhaite contribuer d'une manière pratique à la célébration de la Décennie des Nations Unies sur le droit international (1989-1999), et faciliter la compréhension des moyens dont disposent les Etats pour aider à construire une communauté internationale de stabilité et de paix, en préparant le chemin pour un développement progressif du droit international dans ce domaine.