Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Peter Althouse x
  • Religious Studies x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted Access

Peter Althouse

Abstract

This essay contends that early American Pentecostalism has been shaped and defined by an underlying ideology of power, moulding its charismatic experiences and theological declarations. To demonstrate this, section one will describe how the ideology of power nourished early Pentecostal theology. Section two will offer an interpretive analysis of the social implications of power using the sociological theories of Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. By way of conclusion I suggest that the ideology of power in early Pentecostalism functions as a hermeneutical key.

Restricted Access

Peter Althouse

Abstract

Is the fundamentalist dispensationalism as represented in the Left Behind novels with its anti-Catholic rhetoric compatible with Pentecostalism? If so, what does this mean for the ongoing Pentecostal-Roman Catholic ecumenical dialogue? In order to probe these questions, this essay will first offer a critique of the Left Behind novels, suggesting that their appeal lies in hegemonic protest, but that their dispensational eschatology is based in a problematic literalistic hermeneutic. Secondly, an investigation of early Pentecostalism will suggest that its eschatology was not as fundamentalist as is assumed, but more in keeping with a covenantal eschatology, articulated as the ‘latter rain’ outpouring of the Spirit. Finally, I will propose a revision of Pentecostal eschatology that is conceived in terms of proleptic anticipation of the kingdom, already here but awaiting its final revelation. Proleptic anticipation is faithful to the Pentecostal tradition and better able to open up avenues for ecumenical discussion.

Restricted Access

Winds from the North

Canadian Contributions to the Pentecostal Movement

Series:

Edited by Michael Wilkinson and Peter Althouse

Much of the scholarly focus on early twentieth-century Pentecostalism is dominated by the origins debates of the United States. The polarization between those who argue for Parham’s theological contribution or Seymour’s African American experiential contribution is well known. Beyond these debates scholars typically focus on the role of Americans in the development of Pentecostalism. However, the Hebden mission in Toronto, Canadian women, and the Latter Rain revival illustrate the transnational and innovative qualities of the movement. This book contextualizes the global story of Pentecostalism with some important and often neglected contributions by Pentecostals in Canada and their influence on Pentecostalism in the United States and the world.