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Peter H. Meurer

Abstract

In the first half of his life Galeazzo Gualdo Priorato (b. Vicenza 1608 - d. Vienna 1678) served as an officer in various armies. In about 1640 he embarked on a career as a publicist, and in 1664 was appointed court historian by Emperor Leopold II. Among his many works is a geographical and historical description of the Low Countries (Vienna 1673) to which 138 plans of fortresses are appended. The majority of these are copies after Blaeu and Beaulieu, and only a few are of any value as partially or wholly original sources. From the point of view of the history of science the atlas is a perfect illustration of how the leading role in urban topography gradually passed from the Dutch to the French school during the last third of the seventeenth century.

Peter H. Meurer

Abstract

The present article is a contribution to research on the activities of exiled Dutchmen in connection with the publication of maps, as illustrated by the Caymox family in Nuremberg. Cornelis Caymox (Antwerp?-Nuremberg c.1590), a general trader, sold the maps of Gerard de Jode and Gerard Mercator in Germany (from c.1565). It was he and Hubert Caymox (his brother?) who officially applied for the imperial privilege to print De Jode's atlas in 1574; De Jode's own efforts were obstructed by his rival Abraham Ortelius. Cornelis Caymox also contributed to Braun & Hogenberg's town atlas. Cornelis's relative (his nephew?) Balthasar Caymox (Beerse/Brabant 1561-Nuremberg 1635) set up as a publisher in Nuremberg around 1590. Among his first publications was a re-issue of the 1567 map of Hungary by Matthias Zündt. When the Dutch-born engraver and geographer Matthias Quad (1557-1613) left Cologne and spent some years (c.1605-7) in Nuremberg, he issued some cartographical broadsheets together with Caymox (distance triangle 1605; map of Spain after Blaeu 1606; map of Palestine after Adrichomius and Duchetti c.1606). Caymox was also the publisher of the paper instruments (quadrant, sundial, astrolabe) designed by Franz Ritter (1579-c.1650). Among these is an interesting dial plate of a sundial in the form of a world map, indicating local time, world time and the geographical latitude of the equinox. Balthasar Caymox's business was subsequently (in 1633) taken over by Paulus Fürst (1608-66).