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Editor: R.T. Griffiths
During the 1950's the West European Socialist parties found themselves divided on the question of "European integration". This cleavage not only separated different national parties from each other but caused deep and painful rifts within national parties themselves. The related controversies form the core of this volume, consisting of a synthetic analysis, thirteen national case studies, and testimonies of three "eyewitnesses" (Marinus van der Goes van Naters, Christian Pineau, Mario Zagari) closely involved with the events described. The collection deals with an important aspect of the pre-history of the European Economic Community and provides a useful tool for its comparative study.
In the eighth book of his treatise Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie, Richard Hooker defends the royal headship of the Church of England in a remarkable series of theological arguments. His apologetic intention was 'to resolve the consciences' of the Disciplinarian-Puritan critics of the Elizabethan Settlement by a demonstration that the Royal Supremacy was wholly consistent with the principles of doctrinal orthodoxy as understood and upheld by the Magisterial Reformation.
This study commences with a look at some current problems of interpretation and then examines Hooker's apologetic aim and methodology. Subsequent chapters demonstrate Hooker's reliance on the teaching of the Magisterial Reformers in the formulation of both the soteriological foundations of his political thought and his ecclesiology. Hooker's appeal to the authority of Patristic Christological and Trinitarian Orthodoxy in support of the Royal Supremacy is also discussed.
The purpose of this book is to uncover the theological roots of a central aspect of Hooker's political thought, and thereby to attempt to shed new light on an important Elizabethan controversy.
This work comprises a detailed study of Bucer's thinking on ecclesiastical office. The Strasbourg reformer exercised a great influence on Calvin, among others. This exploration does not only contribute to the knowledge of the body of thoughts and views of this often ignored reformer, whose importance is increasingly being recognised. It also contains a large amount of material which is extremely valuable for current discussion - theological and practical - on office and structure within the Church.
The author has based his research on various rare editions found in libraries all over Europe. He also used many unpublished sources from the abundant archives in Strasbourg.
Forests and State Power in Early Modern Spain, c.1500-1750
Roots of Empire is the first monograph to connect forest management and state-building in the early modern Spanish global monarchy. The Spanish crown's control over valuable sources of shipbuilding timber in Spain, Latin America, and the Philippines was critical for developing and sustaining its maritime empire. This book examines Spain's forest management policies from the sixteenth century through the middle of the eighteenth century, connecting the global imperial level with local lived experiences in forest communities impacted by this manifestation of expanded state power. As home to the early modern world's most extensive forestry bureaucracy, Spain met serious political, technological, and financial limitations while still managing to address most of its timber needs without upending the social balance.
Latin Text and English Translation: Volume 1, Disputations 1-23
This bilingual edition of the Synopsis Purioris Theologiae (1625) makes available for the first time to English readers a seminal treatise of Reformed Scholasticism. Composed by four professors of Leiden University (Johannes Polyander, Andreas Rivetus, Antonius Walaeus, and Anthonius Thysius) , it gives an exhaustive yet concise presentation of Reformed theology as it was conceived in the first decades of the seventeenth century. From a decidedly Reformed perspective, the Christian doctrine is defined in contrast with alternative or opposite views (Catholic, Spiritualist, Arminian, Socinian). Both on the academic level and on the ecclesiastical level, the Synopsis responds to challenges coming from the immediate context of the early seventeenth century. The disputations of this first volume cover topics such as Scripture, doctrine of God, Trinity, creation, sin, Law and Gospel.

Volume One was published in 2014, Volume Two came out in 2016. Volume Three, the final volume, is expected late 2019.
Essays in Honor of John Patrick Donnelly, SJ
From Rome to Zurich, between Ignatius and Vermigli brings notable scholars from the fields of Reformation and Early Modern studies to honor their friend, mentor, and colleague, John Patrick Donnelly with essays commensurate with his own broad interests and scholarship. Touching Protestant scholasticism, Reformation era life writing, Reformation polemics – both Protestant and Catholic – and with several on theology proper, inter alia, the essays collected here by a group of international scholars break new ground in Reformation history, thought, and theology, providing fresh insights into current scholarship in both Reformation and Catholic Reformation studies. The essays take in the broad scope of the 16th century, from Thomas More to Martin Bucer, and from Thomas Stapleton to Peter Martyr Vermigli.

Contributors include: Emidio Campi, Maryanne Cline Horowitz, A. Lynn Martin, Thomas McCoog, SJ, Joseph McLelland, Richard A. Muller, Eric Parker, Robert Scully, SJ, and Jason Zuidema