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This book discusses how Chinese religion and philosophy were represented in printed works produced in the Dutch Republic between 1595 and 1700. By focusing on books, newspapers, learned journals, and pamphlets, Trude Dijkstra sheds new light on the cultural encounter between China and western Europe in the early modern period. Form, content, and material-technical aspects of different media in Dutch and French are analysed, providing novel insights into the ways in which readers could take note of Chinese religion and philosophy. This study thereby demonstrates that there was no singular image of China and its religion and philosophy, but rather a varied array of notions on the subject.
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
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In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
In: Printing and Publishing Chinese Religion and Philosophy in the Dutch Republic, 1595–1700
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Abstract

This article explores the ways in which early modern writers and readers related to and reflected on the Chinese invention of print by way of an examination of Simon de Vries’s Curieuse aenmerckingen der bysonderste Oost en West-Indische dingen of 1682. It will consider De Vries in his ternary role of author, compiler and reader, meaning that his account not only displays the economic rules of cultural consumption to which De Vries was bound as author and compiler, but also his own opinions and preferences as reader.

In the guise of writer, editor, and reader De Vries aims to present his potential readership with a thought-out consideration of the wide variety of European sources available on the subject of Chinese print, concentrating on those elements of contention that may speak for or against either Europe or China’s reputation as technological and cultural power. In the end, neither takes pride of place. By arguing for an independent invention of print, De Vries essentially put China on the same level as Europe.

In: Quaerendo