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William Gerber

This book explores and illustrates the individuating characteristics - and the interrelationships - of love, poetry, and literary immortality (such immortality, that is, as writers may win, in the sense of being long remembered and appreciated by future readers). From the book's numerous quotations of glittering literary passages, it is evident that love is often expressed in poetry, and that many authors (especially those writing about love) have expressed the winsome hope that their works would be greatly cherished by later generations. Part One of the book illustrates by passages of matchless poetry the joys and perils of love and other outstanding features of love. Part Two outlines the history of expressions by writers in many cultures of their confidence or hope that their works will make them immortal.

The Meaning of Life

Insights of the World’s Great Thinkers

Series:

William Gerber

The book aims to present the wisdom of sages, great thinkers, renowned writers, and philosophers, of many countries and time periods, in their own words, regarding life. The book also aims to place the numerous quotations from these sources in a structured organization, with introductory and explanatory comments and comparisons.
Main Topics or Fields - See Organization or Principal Parts.

William Sims Bainbridge

Abstract

Massively multiplayer online (MMO) games are not merely electronic communication systems based on computational databases, but also include artificial intelligence that possesses complex, dynamic structure. Each visible action taken by a component of the multi-agent system appears simple, but is supported by vastly more sophisticated invisible processes. A rough outline of the typical hierarchy has four levels: (1) interaction between two individuals, each either human or artificial, (2) conflict between teams of agents who cooperate with fellow team members, (3) enduring social-cultural groups that seek to accomplish shared goals, and (4) large-scale cultural traditions, often separated into virtual geographic regions. In many MMOs, both magic and religion are represented, in ways that harmonize with a social-scientific theory that defines them in terms of specific versus general psychological compensators. This article draws empirical examples from five diverse MMOs: Dark Age of Camelot, Dungeons and Dragons Online, World of Warcraft, A Tale in the Desert and Gods and Heroes.