Editor: Mo Zhang
This unparalleled reference work offers an overview of ceramics from China. The 16 volumes are arranged by region and contain high quality images of ceramics and detailed descriptions in Chinese and English. The Complete Collection of Ceramic Art Unearthed in China together with the companion set The Complete Collection of Jades Unearthed in China provide an indispensable reference tool for the study of Chinese art. This title is a bilingual English-Chinese publication, published by Science Press. BRILL has exclusive distribution rights outside of China.
The book series Chinese Perspectives on Human Rights and Good Governance is edited within the Institute for Human Rights at the China University of Political Science and Law. It offers scholarly analysis and discussion of the theory and practice of international and national human rights law and good governance issues of particular relevance to China.

This is a new series with an average of one volume per year.

Comparing the three-form reasoning of new Hetu-vidya with Western logic, scholars have put forward four perspectives. Combining their strengths and shortcomings, and the examples of Hetu-vidya reasoning, we can conclude that the three-form reasoning should have four forms: (1) the affirmative expression of formal implication; (2) the modus ponens of hypothetical reasoning concerning sufficient conditions after universal instantiation; (3) the negative expression of a formal implication; and (4) the modus tollens of hypothetical reasoning concerning sufficient conditions after universal instantiation.

In: Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Abstract

With the changes in development of the concept of human rights, thinking concerning the relationship between human rights and development is becoming deeper and deeper. Against this background, the authors profoundly realize that both recognizing economic development as the first priority as some developing countries do, and considering human rights to be the most important thing as most developed countries do, are unilateral and harmful to social progress. Human rights and development are interdependent and mutually promotional. This chapter introduces the three main viewpoints of the relationship between human rights and development. Based on the changes in attitudes of the UN and China to the relationship between human rights and development, this chapter holds that although it is great progress for the Chinese government to understand that human rights and development are interdependent, there are still many difficulties in realizing their mutually beneficial relationship in reality. These difficulties are due to the lack of professionals who enjoy a good understanding of the rules of social development and are capable of practicing human rights theories. Therefore, the authors suggest that the promotion of human rights education is instrumental in the development and progress of human society.

In: The Right to Development
Chinese Contract Law (2nd Ed) offers an in-depth analysis of the contract making process, performance and remedies in the legal framework established under the current regulatory scheme governing contracts in China. The book discusses various contract issues from theoretic and practical viewpoints, and addresses major contractual matters in a comparative way. It examines the law of contracts as drafted, interpreted and applied with Chinese characteristics.

The second edition comprises the latest developments in contract legislation, adjudication and practices in China, including the newly adopted laws, judicial interpretations and guiding cases. It emphasizes contextual distinctions and transactional considerations relevant to contract research and practice. The book provides a meaningful tool to get inside the contemporary contract law of China.
Creative Environment, Creative Subjects
Approaching the prison as a creative environment and imprisoned officials as creative subjects in Ming China (1368-1644), Ying Zhang introduces important themes at the intersection of premodern Chinese religion, poetry, and visual and material culture. The Ming is known for its extraordinary cultural and economic accomplishments in the increasingly globalized early modern world. For scholars of Chinese religion and art, this era crystallizes the essential and enduring characteristics in these two spheres. Drawing on scholarship on Chinese philosophy, religion, aesthetics, poetry, music, and visual and material culture, Zhang illustrates how the prisoners understood their environment as creative and engaged it creatively. She then offers a literature survey on the characteristics of premodern Chinese religion and art that helps situate the questions of “creative environment” and “creative subject” within multiple fields of scholarship.
Editor: Yong Zhang
This book is the second volume of a planned trilogy on legal protection of citizens' rights against the state in East and Southeast Asia. The first volume was published in 1997, under the title of Comparative Studies on the Judicial Review System in East and Southeast Asia. The third book will deal with the subject of due process of law with respect to administrative decision-making in these areas.
This second volume examines the historical development and present function of governmental liability in Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia and Indonesia. Both theoretical and practical problems of governmental liability are analyzed through comparative perspectives. As German and Dutch law have a strong influence in East and Southeast Asian countries, the governmental liability system in these two countries is also discussed. During the process of modernizing the economy and legal systems, especially with the globalization of the economy and the internationalization of Western law, it is inevitable for countries in East and Southeast Asia to introduce a governmental compensation system. However, because of a lack of experience of civil society and the tradition of the rule of law, of shortage of finance, and of different viewpoints on human rights, the introduced and planned governmental compensation systems in East and Southeast Asia could not be expected to function in the same way as those in Western countries. This book is based on the assumption that it is better to prevent damage from happening than compensating for it with money.