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Abstract

The Labor Contract Law of the Peoples Republic of China was promulgated at the 28th session of the Standing Committee of the tenth National Peoples Congress on June 29, 2007 and was put into effect on January 1, 2008. The reasons behind unharmonious labor relations vary. First, legal written labor contracts are rarely signed, making it impossible for employees to effectively protect their legitimate rights and interests during labor disputes. Second, more than 60% of signed labor contracts were short-term contracts, rarely lasting more than a year. Thirdly, employers often use staffing agencies. Fourth, government labor supervision teams cannot meet demands. The formulation of the Labor Contract Law was necessary to solve the above problems and build harmonious labor relations. The Labor Contract Law also outlines provisions for any penalties incurred by employees which cannot exceed the expense of training provided by the employer.

In: The China Legal Development Yearbook, Volume 3
On the Development of Rule of Law in China
This first English volume of The China Legal Development Yearbook features reports on and analyses of a wide range of topics vital to the development of China's legal system, including: criminal law, judicial administration, labor regulations, environmental law, public health law, and issues of corruption. The yearbook is edited by the Institute of Law at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and also includes contributions from practitioners within the Chinese legal system.

Abstract

This front matter section of the book The China Legal Development Yearbook, Volume 1: On the Development of Rule of Law in China contains the table of contents, a preface, acknowledgements, and a list of figures, tables and contributors. The Chinese system of law has had profound influence over Asia and, indeed, the worldwide legal system. With the establishment of the People's Republic of China, a new era of Chinese legal development began. Due to the Reform and Opening Up policies and the continuous gains of the Chinese economy, democratic ideals have influenced rule of law in China.

In: The China Legal Development Yearbook, Volume 1

Abstract

This index of the book The China Legal Development Yearbook, Volume 1: On the Development of Rule of Law in China presents a list of proper nouns, terms and concepts relevant to the discussion on legislation that is the most important aspect of developing Chinese law, and lays the foundation of the People's Congress' ideologies. In 1978, the National People's Congress (NPC) and its Standing Committee emphasized the importance of improving existing legislation by proposing that legal development be number one on the agenda. The National People's Congress and its Standing Committee are authorized to formulate and revise national laws; the State Council is authorized to formulate administrative laws and regulations; the local provincial levels of the People's Congress are authorized to formulate local laws and regulations.

In: The China Legal Development Yearbook, Volume 1