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In: Vision, Narrative, and Wisdom in the Aramaic Texts from Qumran
In: The Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran and the Concept of a Library
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls
In: Journal of Ancient Judaism

Abstract

Since 2002, more than 100 “new” Dead Sea Scrolls fragments have surfaced on the antiquities market. They were launched with great stories and soon became big business. In this study, we analyze the market for post-2002 fragments. After a detailed chronological overview of the sales over the last 20 years, we discuss some of the most essential questions related to these sales: How did a market arise for Dead Sea Scrolls in the twenty-first century? What made some fragments especially attractive? How much money has been spent in total? Where did these new fragments come from? We argue that the post-2002 “saga” reads first and foremost as a story about Christian Dead Sea Scrolls.

In: Journal of Ancient Judaism

Abstract

In the course of the last eighteen years more than 75 new “Dead Sea Scrolls” fragments have surfaced on the antiquities market. These are commonly referred to as post-2002 Dead Sea Scrolls-like fragments. A growing number of scholars regard a substantial part of them as forgeries. In this article, we will discuss four more dubious fragments, but this time from the 20th Century—or at least from pre-2002. Two of the fragments have been known since the late nineties and are published in the DJD series. One was published in Revue de Qumran (2003), and one in Gleanings from the Caves (2016). All four are today accepted as part of the Dead Sea Scrolls dataset even though they are unprovenanced and have made-up—or at least very adaptable—lists of previous owners. In this article, we will critically review their provenance and discuss the lack of proper interest in provenance on the part of the collector who owns them and the scholars who published them.

Open Access
In: Dead Sea Discoveries

Abstract

In 2002 new “Dead Sea Scrolls” fragments began to appear on the antiquities market, most of them through the Kando family. In this article we will present evidence that nine of these Dead Sea Scrolls-like fragments are modern forgeries.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries