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Abstract

The present study provides a description of the syntax of the verbless clause in Targum Neophyti I. It begins with several introductory remarks before proceeding to the main portion of the paper, which consists of a description of the two primary patterns for the verbless clause in Neophyti, each of which may be expanded via extraposition of the subject. The study concludes with a brief discussion of the translation technique of Neophyti, arguing that at least in the case of the verbless clause, Targum Neophyti should be considered idiomatic Aramaic syntax and not a calque of the Hebrew Vorlage.

In: Aramaic Studies

Abstract

This essay explores the Arabic reception of homilies by the Syriac poet Jacob of Serugh (d. 521). More specifically, it argues that at least some of these Arabic homilies are witnessed in distinct textual traditions of Coptic, Melkite, and Syriac Orthodox provenance. The paper includes a survey of previous scholarship on Arabic translations of Jacob, looking at the presentation in Graf’s Geschichte as well as a couple of more recent studies. The bulk of the paper is, however, concerned with the diversity of the Christian Arabic tradition of Jacob, which is investigated through a series of case studies on individual passages.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations

Abstract

This essay explores the Arabic reception of homilies by the Syriac poet Jacob of Serugh (d. 521). More specifically, it argues that at least some of these Arabic homilies are witnessed in distinct textual traditions of Coptic, Melkite, and Syriac Orthodox provenance. The paper includes a survey of previous scholarship on Arabic translations of Jacob, looking at the presentation in Graf’s Geschichte as well as a couple of more recent studies. The bulk of the paper is, however, concerned with the diversity of the Christian Arabic tradition of Jacob, which is investigated through a series of case studies on individual passages.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations

The present study analyses the integration of consonants in Greek loanwords in Syriac. It is shown that in the vast majority of cases each Greek consonantal phoneme is represented by a single consonant in Syriac. Correspondences that deviate from this are usually the result of one of two causes. First, a Koinē form of Greek, instead of Attic, likely served as the source for some of the words that prima facie seem to exhibit irregular correspondences. Second, some of the seemingly irregular correspondences are due to secondary developments in Syriac. This study is based on a corpus of more than eight hundred Greek loanwords and their derivatives found in pre-eighth-century Syriac texts that were not translated from Greek.

Open Access
In: Aramaic Studies

Abstract

It is argued that a longstanding crux interpretum can be solved by analyzing the final ī in nedārî (Ex 15:6) as a relic of the feminine morpheme *ī, which is found elsewhere in the Semitic languages. This analysis provides a further piece of evidence in favor of the early dating of Ex 15:1‐18.

In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Semitic Languages in Contact
In: Semitic Languages in Contact

Abstract

In Aramaic, the productive causative (= C) stem can be reconstructed as *hapˁil- (suffix-conjugation) ~ *yVhapˁil- (prefix-conjugation) with *h as the causative morpheme. There are, however, also traces in Aramaic of what seems to be a non-productive C-stem in which the causative morpheme is š (< Proto-Semitic *s 1). This šap̄ˁel, as it is called, was traditionally thought to result from contact with Akkadian, which has a productive C-stem with a causative morpheme š (< *s 1), i.e., šaprus (stative) ~ ušapris (preterite). Nevertheless, Rabin convincingly argued, against the traditional interpretation, that many šap̄ˁel forms in Aramaic cannot be loanwords from Akkadian. Different suggestions have been made to explain the Aramaic šap̄ˁel forms that are not loanwords from Akkadian. In this article, I propose an additional option: some Aramaic šap̄ˁel forms are, I argue, backformations from *ˀištapˁal- (suffix-conjugation) ~ *yištapˁal- (prefix-conjugation), which I reconstruct as the Proto-Aramaic CT-stem inherited from Proto-Semitic.

Open Access
In: Aramaic Studies
Editors-in-Chief: Willem F. Smelik and Aaron Michael Butts
Aramaic Studies: the leading journal for Aramaic language and literature.

The journal brings all aspects of the various forms of Aramaic and their literatures together to help shape the field of Aramaic Studies.

The journal is the main outlet for the study of all Aramaic dialects, including the languages and literatures of Old Aramaic, Achaemenid Aramaic, Hatran, Palmyrene, Nabataean, Qumran Aramaic, Mandaic, Syriac, the various Jewish dialects of Aramaic and Neo-Aramaic.

Aramaic Studies seeks contributions of a linguistic, literary, exegetical or theological nature for any of the dialects and periods involved, from detailed grammatical work to narrative analysis, from short notes to fundamental research. All contributions submitted to Aramaic Studies are subjected to peer review.

While almost every script of the relevant languages can be printed, Aramaic Studies encourages its authors to provide modern translations of quotations in any of these languages for the benefit of a wide readership, including biblical exegetes and historians whose field of expertise is not Aramaic.

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