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Agnieszka Lekka-Kowalik

The author argues that the answer to the title question is negative. The argument is developed in four points. (1) differences between knowledge, intelligence and wisdom are discussed; (2) the concept of decisions as self-determination is analysed; (3) a case-study is developed in order to show that the decisions of two criminals – not to confess to murder and to confess – can be both seen as rational, even if they are opposite; (4) against of the background of some understandings of wisdom taken from different traditions it is argued that the decision to confess exhibits marks of wisdom which the decision of not to confess does not. It follows then that there are decisions which we see as rational and yet they are not wise.

Series:

Agnieszka Lekka-Kowalik

The author argues that the answer to the title question is negative. The argument is developed in four points. (1) differences between knowledge, intelligence and wisdom are discussed; (2) the concept of decisions as self-determination is analysed; (3) a case-study is developed in order to show that the decisions of two criminals – not to confess to murder and to confess – can be both seen as rational, even if they are opposite; (4) against of the background of some understandings of wisdom taken from different traditions it is argued that the decision to confess exhibits marks of wisdom which the decision of not to confess does not. It follows then that there are decisions which we see as rational and yet they are not wise.

John Paul II University of Lublin, Poland

How History Defines the Relationship between Identity and Internationalization

Series:

Visnja Car and Agnieszka Lekka-Kowalik