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This volume asks why Jewish groups - Sadducees, Pharisees, Essenes and the Dead Sea Scroll sect - flourished during the Maccabean era. It argues that such a result is uncommon, requiring special explanation.
In the introduction, sectarianism is defined and its varieties in Second Temple Judaism assessed. Among the causes of the known results suggested are the encounter with an outside culture that seemed to be weakening the external national perimeter, the impact of expanded literacy, the move to the city from the farm, as well as eschatological hope aroused by Maccabean victory. In proposing these conclusions, full advantage is taken of recently published Qumran sources, such as 4QMMT. The objective is to discover the connection between context and consequence, which will explain why sectarianism was so prominent at that time.
This book presents revised papers delivered at the 1998 and 1999 Taubes Minerva Center for Religious Anthropology conferences. The papers from the 1998 conference discuss the role of sacrifice in religious experience from a comparative perspective. Those from the second conference examine alternatives to sacrifice.
The first theme has been much elaborated in recent scholarship, and the essays here participate in that on-going inquiry. The second theme has been less explored, and the goal of this volume is to stimulate examination of the topic by offering a set of test cases. In both sections of the volume a wide variety of religious traditions are considered.
The essays show that in spite of the inclination we may sometimes have to consider sacrifice part of the idolatrous past, long overcome, it remains a persistent and meaningful part of religious experience.
Millennial movements are characterized by their nature and perception of time, and the ways in which these groups confront inevitable disappointment and then return to “normal” time. This is the theme for the book Apocalyptic Time.
The volume consists of revised essays based on presentations made at an international conference devoted to that theme. Authors adopt a number of disciplinary approaches to the topic, analyzing millennial movements from the three Abrahamic faiths, as well as from the East.
This book will be of particular interest to students of millennial movements, who wish to benefit from the comprehensive and comparative view it gives of the phenomenon, based on a wide variety of cases. This work greatly contributes to the theory of millennialism, by supplying specific data and theoretical reflection.
The papers in this volume were delivered at the first international colloquium by the Jacob Taubes Minerva Center for Religious Anthropology at Bar Ilan University, held in February 1995.
Concepts of Self, Soul and Body are so close to the physiological layers of life that we may imagine them to be biological as well; but in fact, they are social constructs, and a source of fundamental metaphors for the classification of experience. They thus help organize the world, at the same time as they express basic human identity. They vary from culture to culture and can productively be compared and contrasted from one setting to another. We intend these papers to be a test case of the benefit to be gained from attention to Religious Anthropology.
In: The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos
In: The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos
In: The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos
In: The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos
In: The Phoenician History of Philo of Byblos