Search Results

Series:

Alberto Bellocchi

Abstract

In this chapter I present an original study of the interplay between emotions and science inquiry in an 8th-grade science class. I address the need to research emotional learning events by focusing on third-order (introspective) rituals. Research on emotion and science inquiry is scant, making the need for work like this pressing. Through analysis of student emotion diary data during three different inquiry activities, I focus on emotional events that may work against sustained engagement with inquiry. Practical implications are considered through the development of two inter-related perspectives named pedagogy of emotion and emotional pedagogy to assist teachers and students in addressing deleterious emotions related to science inquiry.

Series:

Alberto Bellocchi

Abstract

I present new research in this chapter exploring students’ lived experiences of social bonds – social and emotional connections – in science classrooms. I extend existing research on emotional events to consider their impact on social bond status by focusing on student introspection, or third-order rituals. Drawing on reflective discussions conducted in two 10th grade science classes, my focus was to understand science students’ social bonding experiences and how they are shaped by emotional events. Key aspects of social bond status associated with emotional events are presented including vicarious emotional experiences, personal relationships versus social roles, and how teacher responses to questions may disrupt bonds. Implications for future research on social bonds, emotional events and science learning and teaching are presented.

Series:

James P. Davis and Alberto Bellocchi

Abstract

Our purpose in this chapter is to review a discerning selection of recent science education research on the topic of emotions. Within the theme of theoretical foundations, we firstly discuss the big ideas influencing this body of literature that we describe in terms of ontology, epistemology and time; emotion and embodied experience; mindfulness; expression of emotion; and, emotional energy and emotional climate. We then review the most recent of these studies to highlight the outcomes of these investigations as they relate to school classrooms or teacher education. The studies included in this overview offer a foundation for future research, and support the forthcoming chapters of this collection that document emotional events in a range of contexts and from complementary and new perspectives.

Online and Face-to-Face Learning in Science

Learning Events and Transformation of Understanding

Series:

Alberto Bellocchi and James P. Davis

Abstract

Historical and sociological accounts of events typically refer to abrupt macro-social changes that create discontinuity in social structures, thereby changing society. At a micro-social level of experience, events may also unfold that contribute to important localized change for the particular people involved. This study of a learning event is an original investigation using empirical data sourced from a secondary school science classroom. Our study adopts a micro-social perspective of events in the context of a school science lesson where emotional fluctuations form the basis for an event to be analyzed. In this sense we adopt the learning event as our unit of analysis to understand the lived experience of a student, the turning point in his learning, and the transformation of his understanding of scientific ideas, as localized structures. This study focuses on the experience of a year 9 science student during a lesson involving both online and face-to-face forms of social interaction. The learning event we analyze highlights the possible contribution of this type of analysis to understanding better, the interplay between emotion and cognition in science education contexts.

Series:

BELLOCCHI ALBERTO, JAMES P. DAVIS and DONNA KING

Abstract

In this chapter, we present an original study of the flow of emotional energy that occurs during classroom practices associated with science demonstrations. We take the view that macro-social human practices, such as learning to teach science, are grounded in the micro-social processes that take shape in classroom interactions. Drawing on interaction ritual theory and a theory of eventful learning, the focus is to understand and illustrate the way in which subtle emotions, which bubble away beneath the surface of classroom life, are just as important for understanding how one learns to be a science teacher, as more dramatic counterparts like joy. Beginning with a first order ritual in our teacher education classes, we then follow the flow of emotional energy, a steady and durable form of emotional arousal, across time and space through second-order rituals when preservice and beginning teachers enact demonstrations in their high school science teaching. Implications for future research are considered for tackling the final frontier of interaction rituals research: third order rituals.

Series:

Alberto Bellocchi, Kathy Mills, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny and Jordan Mckenzie

Abstract

STEM education disciplines are facing a dilemma internationally. There is high demand for qualified high quality teachers in science, technology, and mathematics subjects in schools and a trend towards high attrition rates of teachers in the early years. Teacher attrition has been associated with, in part, the high demand for emotion work required on a daily basis in classrooms. Despite this fact, there is dearth of research on teachers’ emotion management in specific disciplinary fields such as science and mathematics education. In this chapter, we address the need for research on teacher emotion work in science and mathematics education through sociological analysis of the lived experiences of two authors. Using narrative vignettes of classroom experiences, we consider what the sociology of emotions can contribute to understanding the emotion work required in science and mathematics classrooms. Following an analysis of the two vignettes, we offer suggestions for research, policy, and practice for addressing STEM teachers’ emotional work through teacher education courses and professional learning.