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Rhetorical Strategies in Late Antique Literature: Images, Metatexts and Interpretation is a collection of essays that survey the rhetorical tropes and the metaliterary dimension of works by important authors in a period marked by intense and thriving contact between Classical paideia and Christian culture. The contributions of this volume dissect the reuse of Classical literature and the deployment of rhetorical techniques in the creation of texts and images meant for use in cultural and religious debates by building on recent interpretations of the late antique cultural landscape as a milieu in which our understanding of religious dichotomies requires a more nuanced reassessment. The authors treated in this volume include Eusebius of Caesarea, Methodius of Olympus, Gregory of Nazianzus, Nonnus and the emperor Julian.

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the ethical and moral portrait of the emperor Theodosius in Zosimus’ New History. It is my working hypothesis that the historian subverted the rhetorical topics usually deployed in the basilikòs lógos to accommodate the emperor’s ethical portrayal to his religious and historiographical programme. In order to do so, Zosimus emptied the concept of ἀνδρεία from its philosophical and moral connotations.

In: Mnemosyne

This paper explores Socrates Scholasticus’ accounts of rhetorical deliveries and allusions to bishops’ oratorical displays in the light of new tendencies in late antique literature and historiography with the aim of concluding that the Church historian considered that rhetorical deliveries were part of the negotiating process in the search of religious consensus.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
In: Rhetorical Strategies in Late Antique Literature
In: Rhetorical Strategies in Late Antique Literature
In: Rhetorical Strategies in Late Antique Literature
In: Rhetorical Strategies in Late Antique Literature