Search Results

Devoted to assessing the state of ocean and coastal governance, knowledge, and management, the Ocean Yearbook Online provides information in one convenient resource.

Articles provide multidisciplinary expert perspectives on contemporary issues. Each new volume draws on policy studies, international relations, international and comparative law, management, marine sciences, economics, and social sciences. Each volume contains key legal and policy instruments and an annually updated global directory of ocean-related organizations.

The Yearbook is a collaborative initiative of the International Ocean Institute in Malta and the Marine & Environmental Law Institute at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.

The Yearbook is also available in print.

 Click on title to see all prices

Author: Aldo Chircop

Abstract

In 2018 the IMO adopted the initial Strategy for the international shipping industry’s reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions towards achieving the goal set in the 2015 Paris Agreement. At this time the Strategy is no more than a preliminary structure to frame the measures that will need to be adopted for the short, medium and long terms. In the short term (2018–2023) a first suite of measures will be adopted, and the initial Strategy will be revised and adopted as changed in 2023 with proposed measures for the medium term (2023–2030) and long term (2030–2050 and beyond). New international standards, tools and best practices will be needed to supplement the existing energy efficiency management rules in the International Convention on the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973/78. This article discusses the Strategy and the role of the IMO in leading the shipping industry on the road to decarbonization.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
Author: Aldo Chircop

Abstract

This article is set against the backdrop of the fundamental physical change in the Arctic and the prospect of increased international shipping, including prospects for new international maritime routes through that region. The multiple levels of governance bearing on Arctic shipping and the need for a review of international maritime rules and standards to facilitate their application to future Arctic navigation are discussed. It is concluded that regional cooperation, inclusion of non-Arctic States in shipping governance, and a uniform set of rules and standards for ship safety and marine environmental protection are needed.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
In: Recent Developments in the Law of the Sea and China
In: The Future of Ocean Regime-Building
In: Law, Science & Ocean Management
In: Places of Refuge for Ships