An Edict for the Caracallan Empire
Author: Alex Imrie
In The Antonine Constitution, Alex Imrie approaches the famous edict of AD 212 from numerous angles, offering an assessment of its rationale that is rooted in the dynamic period of the early third century. Controversial since its discovery, it is depicted here as a keystone in Caracalla’s attempt to revolutionise the public image of the Severan dynasty after murdering his brother.

There is an inherent paradox between the apparently progressive nature of the edict, and the volatile emperor responsible for it. The enigma is only heightened by a dearth of ancient evidence relating to the legislation. By combining literary and material evidence with the surviving papyrological record, Alex Imrie shows that Caracalla’s rationale is best understood in an embedded context.
In: Cassius Dio: The Impact of Violence, War, and Civil War
In: Cassius Dio: The Impact of Violence, War, and Civil War
In: The Antonine Constitution
In: The Antonine Constitution
In: The Antonine Constitution
In: The Antonine Constitution
In: The Antonine Constitution
In: The Antonine Constitution
In: The Antonine Constitution