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Toward the Original of the Apocalypse of Abraham
Author: Alexander Kulik
This work is the first systematic attempt to apply retroversion to Slavonic pseudepigrapha. Slavonic literary tradition preserved translations of many important documents of ancient religious thought. The elaboration of principles and tools for the retroversion of these writings is critical for the proper understanding of the originals. This study contains a new translation of the Apocalypse of Abraham and is organized formally as a discussion of separate problematic segments of the text, classified according to the type of the retroverted phenomena. It will be of interest to those studying Jewish literature of the Second Temple period, early Christianity, history of religious thought, medieval Slavonic literature and linguistics, and ancient and medieval translation techniques.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)
In: The Embroidered Bible: Studies in Biblical Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha in Honour of Michael E. Stone
In: Jews in Byzantium
In: Jews in Byzantium
Editor: Alexander Kulik
The series is uniquely devoted to Judeo-Slavic studies. It covers all aspects of the history and culture of Jews in the Slavic world and the encounter between Jewish and Slavic cultures (including language, literature, and arts) from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series aims to provide a forum for the growing interest and research in the field across disciplines. It welcomes monographs, collected volumes, and editions of primary sources.

Submission Information:
Proposals may be submitted to Alexander Kulik (akulik@mscc.huji.ac.il) and should include a brief (up to one page) description including the following items: author(s)/editor(s) names with addresses and affiliations; tentative title; topic; scope; significance; research method; innovation; relation to/difference from similar publications; target audience; date of submission; and provisional table of contents (optional).

The series published an average of one volume per year for the last 5 years.
Author: Alexander Kulik

Abstract

Although the term for “apocalypse” is not attested as a title or genre definition in the extant corpus of Hebrew or Jewish Aramaic documents, some early Hebrew, Syriac, and Arabic texts may contain rudimentary evidence in favor of the existence of a Hebrew or Jewish Aramaic equivalent for the term. Moreover, its reconstruction can contribute to better understanding of certain wide spread apocalyptic imagery, which must be closely connected to the semantics of this term.

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
Author: Alexander Kulik

Abstract

This paper reexamines the problem of the origins of a popular medieval and modern image of the devil as an anthropomorphic creature with hooves and horns and seeks to reconstruct the analogous ancient image of a satyr-like devil as it could be witnessed in diverse sources, including Hellenistic mythology, rabbinic legends, and early Christian texts. It seems that, not belonging completely to any of these worlds, this therianthropic motif emerges from a complicated literary history wherein Greco-Roman Pan, Jewish seirim, and other mythological figures graft themselves and their imagery around the forces of the demonic. The main argument of the paper as a whole centers around the place of 3 Baruch in this complicated history. This composition may contain the only physical description and detailed treatment of demonic seirim-satyrs in early Jewish literature and the earliest notion of satyr-like demons available to us.

In: Numen
This volume contains selected papers from an international conference held in 2009 in Varna, Bulgaria. The papers represent major trends and developments in current research on the medieval Slavonic biblical tradition, primarily in comparison with Greek and Hebrew texts. The volume covers the translation of the canonical, apocryphal and pseudepigraphical books of the Old and New Testaments and its development over the ninth to sixteenth centuries. Another focus is on issues relating to Cyril and Methodius, the creators of the first Slavonic alphabet in the ninth century and the first translators of biblical books into Slavonic. The analytical approach in the volume is interdisciplinary, applying methodologies from textual criticism, philology, cultural and political history, and theology. It should be of value to Slavists, Hebraists and Byzantinists.
In: The Bible in Slavic Tradition 
In: The Bible in Slavic Tradition