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  • Author or Editor: Alexander Lautensach x
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Education, Crisis, Diachronicity and the Transition to a Sustainable Future
This work contributes to education for sustainability with innovative pedagogy and a new conceptual approach. It is based on a realistic assessment of our future in the Anthropocene, based on principles of human security and scientific models of remaining safe operating space. It critiques current approaches to education for sustainability and highlights solutions. A chapter on the ethics of sustainability education provides the conceptual basis for a taxonomy of learning outcomes and a section on how culturally diverse communities of learners can transform their guiding values in today’s classrooms.
Special attention is given to cultural learning, developing shared visions and diverse approaches, collective learning from transition events such as the 2020 pandemic, cultures learning from each other, and teacher education. The book integrates environmental ethics, zero growth and climate mitigation into a blueprint to educate successfully for a Great Transition to a truly sustainable future for a smaller, wiser humanity.

In: Survival How?
In: Survival How?
In: Survival How?
In: Survival How?
In: Survival How?
In: Survival How?
In: The Havoc of Capitalism
In: The Havoc of Capitalism

The current global environmental crises are largely caused by unsustainable practices and trends and by their impact on ecosystems at all levels. The lack of sustainability extends into the social and cultural dimensions, manifesting as injustice and inequities in global citizenship and human security. Thus, humanity has every reason to re-evaluate and to change its current practices and aspirations in order to achieve a timely transition to a sustainable civilisation. A crucial contribution can come from educational reforms, which are long overdue. In recognition of that global responsibility the United Nations established the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-2014) (DESD). This chapter assesses the merits of the DESD plan in terms of its vision, conceptual coherence, the strategies it recommends, and its underlying assumptions. Its stated goals are compared with the requirements that must be met by a sustainable global society. Its assumptions are examined for values and implicit beliefs. The resulting picture is not encouraging: The DESD plan invokes numerous laudable goals and values but it does not engage with the actual obstacles towards sustainability, or with the inevitable dilemmas. It neglects intergenerational justice, and it virtually ignores interspecies justice. It does not provide a coherent and convincing vision of sustainability. As well, its stated outcomes do not address the full spectrum of necessary changes. Its greatest accomplishment is to place ESD prominently on the educational agenda in many countries. To improve on that unsatisfactory situation, educators must address the root causes for the educational shortfall so far. They cannot accomplish that by merely restricting themselves to the DESD regime. We suggest where the major gaps lie in education for sustainability, and how they can be addressed. One essential step involves educating young learners to negotiate moral compromises to ensure the acceptable survival for the greatest sustainable number.

In: Power, Justice and Citizenship: The Relationships of Power