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  • Author or Editor: Alexander Marr x
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This article proposes a new interpretation of Guillam van Haecht the Younger's The Gallery of Cornelis van der Geest (1628) as an extended exploration of ingenuity. It examines the ways in which the picture mobilises pictorially and linguistically varied aspects and meanings of ingenuity (ingenium, gheest, wit, esprit), in relation to connoisseurship, artistic theory, rhetoric, and natural philosophy. It situates the picture’s presentation of Flemish wit specifically within the Antwerpian milieu of the liefhebbers der schilderyen, including celebration of the Antwerp School of painters, from Metsys to Rubens. Among the various forms of ingenious discernment the picture reflected and sought to cultivate in its viewers, self-evaluation was critically important.

In: Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online
In: Lomazzo’s Aesthetic Principles Reflected in the Art of his Time
In: Descartes and the Ingenium     
In: Documenting the Early Modern Book World
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Richard Haydocke’s manuscript treatise Oneirologia (1605) is a learned account in English of the medical nature of sleep and dreams. This article presents a commented edition of the manuscript, an account of the circumstances that led to its composition, and a commentary on its contents. Apparently composed on the orders of King James i (whose ‘arguments’ against rational discourse in sleep it includes), Oneirologia is a significant document in the history of early modern erudition. The treatise reflects the orthodox physiognomic and psychological explanations of sleep and dreaming expounded in the universities, as well as its author’s experience as a writer on and practitioner of the visual arts. A product of the febrile political climate in England around the time of the Gunpowder Plot, Oneirologia touches upon major themes in society and religion, including the nature of royal authority, mens rea, and divine revelation.

In: Erudition and the Republic of Letters
In: Descartes and the Ingenium     
In: Descartes and the Ingenium