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The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education
Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.
We live in a time of unprecedented media use, much of which can be accessed by devices that fit in our pockets. Young people, in particular, make use of media on a near-constant basis. How can this media use be better understood?

This text focuses on the scholarship and research of David Buckingham, a global leader in media literacy education and children’s and young people’s media cultures. It is not an exaggeration to state that studies and applications of media literacy education around the globe are indebted to the scholarship of Buckingham and that more nuanced understandings of how children and young people make sense of their media choices are due, in large part, to Buckingham’s work.

Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham focuses on the key contributions of Buckingham’s work over his prolific career, illuminating the advances he made in the field of media literacy education and understandings of young people’s media cultures. Through a close look at Buckingham’s theoretical advancements, contributions to the larger field of media literacy education, and the key strains of his research – how children and young people learn, what they already know about media and pop culture before they enter classrooms, end media content about and for youth – this text delineates Buckingham’s vast bibliography and will be an invaluable resource for anyone curious to know more about children, youth, and media literacy education.

Analysis of Buckingham’s work is drawn from his robust bibliography, exploration of scholarship he has critiqued, interpretation of contemporary social concerns through the lens of his research, and formal and informal conversations with him over the course of several years.
Chapter 6 Conclusion

Abstract

This discusses Buckingham’s latest work on young people’s media cultures. This chapter makes space to discuss lingering gaps in media literacy research and ways to address them. The chapter ends with a discussion of the current COVID pandemic and how Buckingham’s theories and practices have helped the author better understand the current climate.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Chapter 1 Theoretical Underpinnings and Advancements

Abstract

This chapter covers Buckingham’s intellectual background, including a discussion of his theoretical underpinnings. This chapter also shares definitions of media literacy and emphasizes the concepts of media literacy codified by Buckingham and colleagues. Lastly, the chapter emphasizes the importance of context in media analysis.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Chapter 2 Major Contributions

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Buckingham’s major contributions to the field of children and youth cultures and media literacy education. Attention is paid to doing critical analysis, resisting binary effects arguments, and exploring the role of technology. Within these subsections are discussions of representations of sex and violence, concerns about childhood obesity, and the role of data mining in digital media and educational technologies.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Chapter 3 How Do Children and Young People Learn?

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Buckingham’s work that addresses how children and young people learn. It details how Buckingham broke away from the prevailing theories of media literacies and details the action research grounded in classrooms. The chapter also explores how media literacy can be brought into the classroom to build children and young people’s learning more effectively.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Chapter 4 What Do Children and Young People Already Know?

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the second key strain of Buckingham’s research: What children and young people already know about the media and their media choices. It focuses on how children’s and young people’s relationships with media can be understood in their own social environments, and how they express their knowledge.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Chapter 5 Children and Young People’s Media Culture

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Buckingham’s analysis of children’s media cultures, exploring content created for young people as well as how children and young people are constructed as consumers. The chapter closes with an exploration of a contemporary phenomenon, the micro-video sharing platform, TikTok, and how it can be used as a topic for advancing media literacy.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Introduction

Abstract

This chapter introduces David Buckingham and articulates his role as a leader in studies of media literacy education and children’s media cultures. It defends the importance of studying the media. The chapter outlines Buckingham’s intellectual trajectory and shares information on his major contributions.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Chapter 2 Critical Media Literacy

Abstract

This chapter illustrates the necessity of a new starting point for media literacy learning: In teacher education programs. Teachers educated in media literacy will be able to integrate the study of the media across their classroom work, which may serve to connect their subject matter more directly with students, can contribute to a student-centered classroom, and can engage students and teachers together in a project of social justice-focused change making. Specifically, this chapter defines critical media literacy and starts the discussion on why the attention to structures of power is needed as part of media literacy training.

In: Educating Media Literacy