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Editor: Alyssa DeBlasio
As of 2021, the volumes in Contemporary Russian Philosophy are published in a separate series rather than as a subseries of the Value Inquiry Book Series. Please visit the Contemporary Russian Philosophy homepage.

Contemporary Russian Philosophy explores a variety of perspectives in and on philosophy as it is currently being practiced in Russia. Co-sponsored by the Center for Professional and Applied Ethics at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, and by the Russian Philosophical Society, this special series features collaborative works between Russian and Western scholars on topics of philosophical importance. The series also publishes monographs and collections of essays by Russian philosophers, as well as studies by all scholars on topics related to contemporary Russian philosophy. All volumes are published in English.
Editor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Contemporary Russian Philosophy explores a variety of perspectives in and on philosophy as it is currently being practiced in Russia. Co-sponsored by the Center for Professional and Applied Ethics at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, and by the Russian Philosophical Society, this special series features collaborative works between Russian and Western scholars on topics of philosophical importance. The series also publishes monographs and collections of essays by Russian philosophers, as well as studies by all scholars on topics related to contemporary Russian philosophy. All volumes are published in English.

Prior to 2021, the volumes in Contemporary Russian Philosophy were published as a subseries of the Value Inquiry Book Series. Please visit the Contemporary Russian Philosophy, subseries of the Value Inquiry Book Series page to view previous publications.
Volume Editors: Alyssa DeBlasio and Victoria Juharyan
This volume explores the influence of the Socratic legacy in the Russian, East European, and Soviet contexts. For writers, philosophers, and artists, Socrates has served as a potent symbol—of the human capacity for philosophical reflection, as well as the tumultuous (and often dangerous) reality in which Russian-speaking and Soviet intellectuals found themselves. The thirteen chapters include surveys of historical periods and movements (the 18th century, Nietzscheanism, and the “Greek Renaissance” of Russian culture), studies of individual writers and philosophers (Skovoroda, Herzen, Dostoevsky, Rozanov, Bely, Narbut, and many others), and investigations of Socratic subtexts (e.g., in Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita and Nosov’s Neznaika series for children). The volume concludes with a “Socratic Texts” section of new translations. The plurality of these topics demonstrates the continued relevance of the Socratic myth not only for Russian-speaking culture, but for the world.
Author: Alyssa DeBlasio

Abstract

Georgian-born director Dmitry Mamuliya studied at Tbilisi State University during the final years of Mamardashvili’s life, when the philosopher was living and lecturing in Tbilisi. This chapter engages Mamuliya’s experimental approach to sound and the absence of voice in his first two feature films, Another Sky (2010) and The Criminal Man (2019), with Mamardashvili’s work from the 1980s on the crisis of consciousness in late Soviet society, in particular the problem of language. This is a continuation of an exercise I have been conducting for several years in the philosophy of film, whereby I have sought to engage the work of filmmakers influenced by Mamardashvili with the content of Mamardashvili’s philosophical ideas. By analyzing Russian cinema in its direct intellectual context, I hope to shed new light on the ways in which films can express philosophical ideas on their own terms. Where Mamardashvili and Mamuliya are concerned, their work shares a deep concern that society—at their respective historical moments—is moving towards a sickness of consciousness that risks damaging the social fabric and integrity of the human mind.

In: Rethinking Mamardashvili: Philosophical Perspectives, Analytical Insights
Globalization is a defining characteristic of our contemporary world, with a reach and impact affecting all nations and peoples. Philosophical Aspects of Globalization is a collection of essays by leading contemporary Russian philosophers, scholars, and scientists concerned with addressing pressing issues of globalization from a philosophical point of view. The thirty-four authors who have contributed to this book represent a range of approaches and subfields of Global Studies in Russia, including topics such as theory of globalization, globalization and the environment, history and geopolitics, and globalization in cultural context. When compiled together in a single collection of essays, their work offers the English-speaking reader a comprehensive picture of new directions in Russian Global Studies in the twenty-first century, as well as demonstrates the importance of questions of globalization for philosophical inquiry in Russia today.