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Author: Amin El-Yousfi

Abstract

In this chapter, I argue that Taha Abderrahmane’s concept of trusteeship (iʾtimāniyya) that I describe as worldly based, humanly shouldered and divinely led, is not only producing a discourse within the realm of Islamic discursivity, but it is nurturing conceptually the “anthropology of Islam” by defining the “correct model.” Abderrahmane’s “original unity” between taʿabbud (worship) and tadbīr (management) gives a clear definition of the source of ethical practice. I would illustrate how the concept of iʾtimāniyya is a necessary philosophical base to study some crucial aspects of the reality of faith that are downplayed by the works of Talal Asad (b. 1932), Saba Mahmood (1962–2018) and others who belong to the so called “ethical turn” in anthropological studies. In other words, in the absence of the “trusteeship paradigm” (al-unmūdhaj al-iʾtimānī) as a tool for analysis, MacIntyre’s (b. 1929) Aristotelian moral philosophy and the Foucauldian understanding of ethics, power and discourse that Asad and Mahmood based their framework on remain insufficient and to a certain extent misleading to the understanding of Muslim subjectivities.

Open Access
In: Islamic Ethics and the Trusteeship Paradigm: Taha Abderrahmane’s Philosophy in Comparative Perspectives
Author: Amin El-Yousfi

Abstract

In this chapter, I argue that Taha Abderrahmane’s concept of trusteeship (iʾtimāniyya) that I describe as worldly based, humanly shouldered and divinely led, is not only producing a discourse within the realm of Islamic discursivity, but it is nurturing conceptually the “anthropology of Islam” by defining the “correct model.” Abderrahmane’s “original unity” between taʿabbud (worship) and tadbīr (management) gives a clear definition of the source of ethical practice. I would illustrate how the concept of iʾtimāniyya is a necessary philosophical base to study some crucial aspects of the reality of faith that are downplayed by the works of Talal Asad (b. 1932), Saba Mahmood (1962–2018) and others who belong to the so called “ethical turn” in anthropological studies. In other words, in the absence of the “trusteeship paradigm” (al-unmūdhaj al-iʾtimānī) as a tool for analysis, MacIntyre’s (b. 1929) Aristotelian moral philosophy and the Foucauldian understanding of ethics, power and discourse that Asad and Mahmood based their framework on remain insufficient and to a certain extent misleading to the understanding of Muslim subjectivities.

Open Access
In: Islamic Ethics and the Trusteeship Paradigm: Taha Abderrahmane’s Philosophy in Comparative Perspectives