Spirit and Nature in the Christianity-Buddhism-Science Trialogue
Author: Amos Yong
Recent thinking in the interfaith dialogue and in the theology-science dialogue have taken a “pneumatological turn.” The Cosmic Breath explores this pneumatological theology as unfolded in the Christian-Buddhist dialogue alongside critical interaction with the theology-and-science conversation. As an attempt in comparative and constructive Christian philosophical theology, its central thesis is that a pneumatological approach to Buddhist traditions in further dialogue with modern science generates new philosophical resources that invigorate Christian thinking about the natural world and humanity’s place in it. The result is a transformation of the Buddhist-Christian dialogue from insights generated in the theology-and-science interface and a contribution to the religion-and-science dialogue from a comparative theological and philosophical perspective.
Author: Amos Yong
Recent thinking in Christian theology of religions has taken a “pneumatological turn” which asks how the doctrine of the Holy Spirit can contribute to the interreligious dialogue and to the emerging discourse of comparative theology. Pneumatology and the Christian-Buddhist Dialogue. Does the Spirit Blow through the Middle Way? tests the viability of this approach as applied to the Christian-Buddhist dialogue. Various Christian and Buddhist traditions are compared and contrasted within a pneumatological framework. Is the Holy Spirit to be found along the Buddha’s middle way? Some Christians say yes, while others demur. The thesis of this volume is that such a pneumatological perspective opens up possibilities for the deepening and transformation of Christian theology in the religiously plural world of the twenty-first century.
Author: Amos Yong

Abstract

Modern Pentecostalism, named after the Day of Pentecost event in Acts 2, has come to be associated with a theology of the Spirit. Yet whether contemporary pentecostal theology has a coherent understanding of the Spirit, or whether the plurality of pentecostal and charismatic Christianities presume a diversity of pneumatologies instead, are open questions. This article suggests how the many tongues of the Spirit poured out on all flesh on the Day of Pentecost can be said to anticipate the multiplicity of theologies of the Spirit in the present global renewal landscape. Yet it is also precisely herein that historic and contemporary Pentecostalisms and their interfaces with the public square provide opportunities and present challenges for the ongoing discussion of the doctrine of the Spirit in particular and for the public theological task in general.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
In: Pneuma
In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
In: Pneuma