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Edited by Andrea Falcon

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Andrea Falcon

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Edited by Andrea Falcon

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Edited by Andrea Falcon

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ANDREA FALCON

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Edited by Andrea Falcon

Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Aristotle provides a systematic yet accessible account of the reception of Aristotle’s philosophy in Antiquity. To date, there has been no comprehensive attempt to explain this complex phenomenon. This volume fills this lacuna by offering broad coverage of the subject from Hellenistic times to the sixth century AD. It is laid out chronologically and the 23 articles are divided into three sections: I. The Hellenistic Reception of Aristotle; II. The Post-Hellenistic Engagement with Aristotle; III. Aristotle in Late Antiquity. Topics include Aristotle and the Stoa, Andronicus of Rhodes and the construction of the Aristotelian corpus, the return to Aristotle in the first century BC, and the role of Alexander of Aphrodisias and Porphyry in the transmission of Aristotle's philosophy to Late Antiquity.
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Andrea Falcon

Abstract

The opening lines of the Meteorology suggest that Aristotle was centrally concerned with the integration of a range of different natural investigations into a single program of study. This essay will attempt to illustrate how this integration is achieved by looking at the place of the De Motu Animalium (hereafter De Motu) in Aristotle’s natural philosophy. At least at first sight, this short but difficult treatise does not seem to be a very promising case. It has been argued that the De Motu does not belong to natural philosophy (or to any other Aristotelian science for that matter). On this interpretation, the De Motu would be an “interdisciplinary work” or even “a [deliberate and fruitful] departure from the Organon model” (Martha Nussbaum, Aristotle’s De Motu Animalium. Princeton 1978: 113). Hopefully, a fresh look at the opening lines of the De Motu will help, not only to establish that it pertains to natural philosophy, but also to show how it contributes to the explanatory project pursued by Aristotle.