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Andreas Marks

Japanese woodblock prints exemplified by such iconographic images as Hokusai’s Great Wave, Hiroshige’s Heavy Rain on Ohashi bridge, or Utamaro’s enticing beauties, constitute one of the most important and influential art forms in art history.

Today, the names of these artists themselves are celebrated throughout the world, and yet very little is known about the publishers of these artworks, despite the fact that they played a crucial role in the production, visual appearance and actual distribution of the works within the highly commercial world of Japanese printmaking. It was the publisher who gauged the markets, commissioned the artists and took on the risks of production. Once a design was completed by an artist, it was the publisher who coordinated the production process, farming out the work to the block carvers and printers, and also managed the distribution of the prints in the appropriate markets.

This volume champions the publisher – the enabler – without whom the great artworks which influenced painters like Monet, Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh and others, would never have been produced.

Publishers of Japanese Woodblock Prints: A Compendium focuses on the production process of Japanese woodblock prints with an emphasis on the role of the publisher. This publication presents over 1,100 publishers, with comprehensive lists of publications by a total of 572 artists and facsimiles of over 2300 publisher seals, spanning a time period from the 1650s to the 1990s.
The publisher entries include details on the residence of a publisher, his clientele, the period of his commercial activity as well as a list of issued print series in chronological order. This listing offers insight into the status and versatility of a publisher, as well as indicating the publisher’s specialities, favoured artists and the particular strategies pursued. With almost 600 pages of information on the publishers of Japanese woodblock prints, this publication is an essential reference work for scholars and collectors of Japanese prints alike.

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Andreas Marks

Genji's world in Japanese Woodblock Prints provides the first comprehensive overview of Genji prints, an exceptional subject and publishing phenomenon among Japanese woodblock prints that gives insight into nineteenth-century Japan and its art practices.
In the late 1820s, when the writer Ryūtei Tanehiko (1783–1842), the print designer and book illustrator Utagawa Kunisada (1786–1865) and the publisher Tsuruya Kiemon sat down together in Edo to plot the inaugural chapter of the serial novel A Rustic Genji by a Fraudulent Murasaki (Nise Murasaki inaka Genji), it is doubtful that any one of them envisioned that their actions would generate a new genre in Japanese woodblock prints that would flourish until the turn of the century, Genjie (“Genji pictures”). During these sixty years, over 1,300 original designs were created, of which many were very popular at their time of release.
The story of A Rustic Genji, set in fifteenth-century Japan, is in many respects drawn from Murasaki Shikibu’s (c.973–1014/25) classic novel The Tale of Genji from the early eleventh century.
As the foremost collection of prints of this subject, the extensive holdings of Paulette and Jack Lantz provided the majority of images necessary for this publication.
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Kunisada's Tōkaidō

Riddles in Japanese Woodblock Prints

Andreas Marks

The Tōkaidō highway, connecting Edo with Kyoto, was the most vital thoroughfare in Japan. Its cultural presence in pre- to early modern Japanese society led to the publication of woodblock print series, such as the widely known landscape prints by Hiroshige, that took this famous road as their theme.
The prints of Utagawa Kunisada, the most sought-after woodblock print designer of his day, represent a different treatment of the Tōkaidō, in which popular kabuki actors in specific roles are paired with Tōkaidō post stations. This study discusses the phenomenon of serialization in Japanese prints outlining its marketing mechanisms and concepts. It then proceeds to unravel Kunisada’s pairings of post-stations and kabuki roles,
which served as puzzles for his audience to decipher. Finally, this study analyses Kunisada’s methods when he invented and developed these patterns.
Kunisada’s Tōkaidō is a valuable visual source for the print collector, illustrating over 700 prints and it has been selected for an Honorable Mention at the 2014 IFPDA (International Fine Print Dealers Association) Book Award.
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Andreas Marks

Herausgeber: Mark Häberlein, Rauscher, Peter and Serles, Andrea

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Mark T. Wallace, Andrea Hillock-Dunn, Ryan Stevenson, Juliane Krueger-Fister, Diana Sarko and Dipanwita Ghose

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Mark-Oliver Rödel, Sebastian Demtröder, Claire Fuchs, Diana Petrich, Friedrich Pfisterer, Andreas Richter, Clemens Stolpe, Ramona Voß, Simon Peter Ripperger, Frieder Mayer, Carolin Dittrich and Jürgen Thein

We experimentally investigated whether intraspecific and intersexual attraction (or avoidance) by chemical signals may bias newt trapping success. We installed commercially available fish funnel traps which are often used in newt monitoring studies. We tested if capture rates differed between traps with or without newts. One experimental trap set comprised five traps, one trap being empty and four traps containing one male or female Lissotriton vulgaris or Ichthyosaura alpestris, respectively. Capture rates of newts of neither species nor sex was significantly affected by the presence of a particular newt species or sex in the traps, compared to control traps without newts. Trapping success thus seems not to be biased beyond random effects.

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Tim Behrend, Nancy K. Florida, Harold Brookfield, Judith M. Heimann, Harold Brookfield, Victor T. King, J.G. Casparis, Roy E. Jordaan, H.J.M. Claessen, Francoise Douaire-Marsaudon, Matthew Isaac Cohen, Andrew Beatty, Matthew Isaac Cohen, Sylvia Tiwon, Freek Colombijn, Victor T. King, Bernhard Dahm, Cive J. Christie, J. Goor, Leonard Blussé, David Henley, Robert W. Hefner, David Henley, James F. Warren, Huub Jonge, Laurence Husson, Nico Kaptein, Mark R. Woodward, Catharina Klinken, Gunter Senft, W. Mahdi, J.G. Casparis, Henk Maier, David Smyth, Toon Meijl, Robert J. Foster, J.A. Moor, Douglas Kammen, Joke Reenen, Audrey Kahin, Heather Sutherland, Craig J. Reynolds, Nicholas Tarling, Patrick Tuck, B.J. Terwiel, Andreas Sturm, René S. Wassing, Koos Brakel, Edwin Wieringa and J. Bruin

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