Edited by Berndt Hamm, Reinhold Friedrich and Andreas Puchta

Unlike most theologians of his age, Martin Bucer had a wide range of vision with respect to European affairs: In addition to his contacts within Alsace and Germany, he established relations with almost every country on the Continent. It was his ecumenical attitude that always led him to mediate between the parties in the religious battles of his time. His deep commitment and his objective to reach an agreement can be traced in all his activities, works and letters.
As Bucer did not found a religious denomination himself, his theological and historical importance has been underestimated for a long time. In addition his handwriting is hard to decipher, which makes it difficult to deal with his works, especially with his letters.
Bucer's letters (BCor) have been published in chronological order as part of the "Opera omnia" since 1979 (Leiden, Brill, I: 1979; II: 1989; III: 1995; IV: 2000). Since the editor, Jean Rott (Strasbourg), died Bucer's correspondence has been edited in Erlangen. This academic edition of source material will provide future research with a broad basis for significant aspects of Reformation history about which very little is known.

Edited by Reinhold Friedrich, Berndt Hamm, Andreas Puchta and Roland Liebenberg

Unlike most theologians of his age, Martin Bucer proved to be farsighted with respect to European affairs: In addition to his contacts within Alsace and Germany he established relations with almost every European country. It was his ecumenical attitude that always led him to mediate between the parties in the religious battles of his time. His deep commitment to the goal of reaching agreement can be traced in all his activities, works and letters.
Since the first editor, Jean Rott (Strasbourg), died in 1998, Bucer's correspondence has been edited in Erlangen. This academic edition of source material provides future research with a broad basis for significant aspects of Reformation history about which very little is known. Volume V covers the period from September 1530 to May 1531. It therefore mainly contains information about Bucer's diplomatic journey after the Augsburg Diet, his correspondence with the Valdesian synod of Mérindol, his attempts to mediate between Luther and Zwingli with the help of his Konkordienschrift and to integrate the Swiss party in the Schmalcaldic confederation.