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Book History Online (BHO) is the international bibliography in the field of book and library history. It provides a comprehensive survey of all scholarly publications written from a historical perspective. Included are monographs, articles and reviews dealing with the history of the printed book, its arts, crafts, techniques and equipment, its economic, social and cultural environment, as well as its production, distribution, preservation and description. In particular, BHO contains information on topics such as papermaking, bookbinding, book illustration, type design, typefounding, bibliophily, book collecting, libraries and individuals.

Features
- Access to nearly 120,000 records
- Logging scholarly publications from the late 19th century until today
- Entries ordered by subject, country or period
- Covering over 40 languages (predominantly German, English, French and Dutch)
- Search by title, author, keyword, language and more
- Personal tools include save searches, search alerts and exporting tools
- Updated regularly

BHO is the online continuation of the Annual Bibliography of the History of the Printed Book and Libraries (ABHB), initially edited by Hendrik D.L. Vervliet and subsequently by the Department of Special Collections of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (The Hague). The first volume was published in 1970.
The Handpress World explores the impact of the invention of printing by moveable type from the first experiments of the incunabula age through to the end of the eighteenth century. In this crucial period of book history the new technology both transformed established markets for scholarly and religious literature and found a new public through the rise of the pamphlet and later the newspaper. The series will investigate every aspect of this cultural transformation, from the promotion in print of the great intellectual movements of the day through to the birth of the public library.
This work offers a series of linked studies of European print culture in the sixteenth century, focusing particularly on France and the regional, provincial experience of print. France, in the sixteenth century, was one of the great centres of the European publishing industry. But in the second half of the century the established dominance of Paris and Lyon was increasingly challenged by other new printing centres, stimulated in part by the religious and political crisis of the French Wars of Religion. Drawing on the data collected by the St Andrews French book project, the author reconstructs the enigmatic history of a number of previously unstudied printers. The focus throughout is on popular print, and the growth of mass market for news, entertainment and religious instruction.

Customers interested in this title may also be interested in French Vernacular Books, edited by Andrew Pettegree, Malcolm Walsby and Alexander Wilkinson.
This volume offers an expansive survey of the role of single-sheet publishing in the European print industry during the first two centuries after the invention of printing. Drawing on new materials made available during the compilation of the Universal Short Title Catalogue, the twenty contributors explore the extraordinary range of broadsheet publishing and its contribution to government, pedagogy, religious devotion and entertainment culture.
Long disregarded as ephemera or cheap print, broadsheets emerge both as a crucial communication medium and an essential underpinning of the economics of the publishing industry.