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In: A Companion to Meister Eckhart
Author: Andrew Weeks

Abstract

Jonathan Israel’s Radical Enlightenment appears in a different light when read in conjunction with George H. Williams’ Radical Reformation and Israel’s own history of The Dutch Republic. The radical dissent of the Reformation and its aftermath extended to Holland, influencing Spinoza’s milieu and creating preconditions for his Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670). The radical turn attributed by Israel to Spinoza appears less unprecedented when juxtaposed with its extended Reformation background, including the German speculative or mystical dissenters who anticipated his themes.

In: The Radical Enlightenment in Germany
In: Die Wiederkehr der Renaissance im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert – The Revival of the Renaissance in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Author: Andrew Weeks

Abstract

Jonathan Israel’s Radical Enlightenment appears in a different light when read in conjunction with George H. Williams’ Radical Reformation and Israel’s own history of The Dutch Republic. The radical dissent of the Reformation and its aftermath extended to Holland, influencing Spinoza’s milieu and creating preconditions for his Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670). The radical turn attributed by Israel to Spinoza appears less unprecedented when juxtaposed with its extended Reformation background, including the German speculative or mystical dissenters who anticipated his themes.

In: The Radical Enlightenment in Germany
In: Jacob Böhme and His World
Author: Andrew Weeks

Paracelsus, Valentin Weigel, and Jacob Böhme are not only linked by a clear chain of influence and borrowing; they are all deeply rooted in the Protestant Reformation. However, the tendency to assign Paracelsus to medicine or the Renaissance and to subsume Weigel and Böhme under the anachronistic heading of “German mysticism” has obfuscated their kinship as well as their significance in German intellectual history. Their relegation distorts the breadth of the reform set in motion after 1517. They share an anticlerical tendency and a determination to expand the Reformation beyond doctrine and devotion to encompass other spheres of life and learning. Their reforming antiauthoritarianism found expression both in the nature philosophy of Paracelsus and in the mystical impulses of Weigel and Böhme.

In: Daphnis
Author: Andrew Weeks
The daunting writings of Paracelsus—the second largest 16th-century body of writings in German after Luther’s—contributed to medicine, natural science, alchemy, philosophy, theology, and esoteric tradition. This volume provides a critical edition of essential writings from the authoritative 1589 Huser Paracelsus alongside new English translations and commentary on the sources and context of the full corpus. The Essential Theoretical Writings incorporate topics ranging from metaphyics, cosmology, faith, religious conflict, magic, gender, and education, to the processes of nature, disease and medication, female and male sufferings, and cures of body and soul. Properly contextualized, these treatises yield rich extracts of Renaissance and Reformation culture, soundings of 16th-century life, and keys to an influential but poorly understood early modern intellectual tradition.