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This introductory article explains how the concept of biopolitics can be used as an analytical tool in the sphere of Russian studies. The author elucidates different approaches to the idea of biopolitics in contemporary political philosophy, and relates the extant theoretical debate to the ongoing political and academic discussions on power and identity in Russia, both from domestic and international perspectives. He claims that biopolitical vocabulary is a nuanced cognitive instrument for unpacking a plethora of social and cultural dimensions inherent to relations of power, and further conceptualizing the specificity of post-Soviet illiberal regimes.

In: Russian Politics

The paper explores the identitarian context of Russia’s cinematic narratives on the war in Chechnya. It draws on various strategies of war representation through films and uncovers their ideological and political underpinnings. The author explicates how the cinematographic imagery grounded in the Chechen war experience boosts the hegemonic discourse of the Kremlin, and then discusses whether fictional films deliver critical or counter-hegemonic arguments.

In: Transcultural Studies

This article offers a new approach to Russian foreign policy under Putin’s presidency as shifting from its ‘soft power’ model to what might be characterized through the prism of biopower. The author discusses the various meanings attached to the concept of attraction, and scrutinises the biopolitical turn in Russia as a domestic phenomenon and as a key element of Russia’s power projection abroad. It is argued that biopolitics as a power instrument can play different roles – it can be a tool to construct Russian national (and simultaneously imperial) identity and to distinguish Russia from the West, and channel for communication with conservative forces across the globe.

In: Russian Politics
In this groundbreaking book, Andrey Makarychev approaches populism through a critical biopolitical lens and shows that populist narratives are grounded intrinsically in corporeality, sexuality, health, bodily life and religious practices. The author demonstrates that populism is a phenomenon deeply rooted in mass culture. He compares three countries -- Estonia, Ukraine and Russia--that all share post-Soviet experiences offering a broad spectrum of populist discourses. The three case studies display the interconnection between biopower and populism through references to culture, media, art, theatrical performances and literature, raising new questions and directions for understanding traditional accounts of populism.
In: Popular Biopolitics and Populism at Europe’s Eastern Margins
In: Popular Biopolitics and Populism at Europe’s Eastern Margins
In: Popular Biopolitics and Populism at Europe’s Eastern Margins
In: Popular Biopolitics and Populism at Europe’s Eastern Margins
In: Popular Biopolitics and Populism at Europe’s Eastern Margins
In: Popular Biopolitics and Populism at Europe’s Eastern Margins