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Anna Barcz

Abstract

The hypothesis of the article* is based on the observation that a psychological impression is insufficient to explain why there is some similarity between humans and animals. It is not a direct relation like similarity commonly given as an example: between parents and children. Though, a source generating this aesthetic illusion, no matter how realistically, must be located somewhere else. First, I associate it with the pre-evolutionary materials: in physiognomy developed especially in the 18th century and somehow anticipating Darwin’s main assumptions in The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals. Then, I analyze how Darwin was included in the popular aesthetic narrative, and how the notion of similarity between humans and animals was developed with Darwin’s input, providing particular consequences—relevant until today—like animal anthropomorphisation.

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Edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka

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Edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka

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Edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka

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Edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka

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Edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka

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Animals and Their People

Connecting East and West in Cultural Animal Studies

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Edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka

Animals and Their People: Connecting East and West in Cultural Animal Studies, edited by Anna Barcz and Dorota Łagodzka, provides a zoocentric insight into philosophical, artistic, and literary problems in Western, Anglo-American, and Central-Eastern European context. The contributors go beyond treating humans as the sole object of research and comprehension, and focus primarily on non-human animals. This book results from intellectual exchange between Polish and foreign researchers and highlights cultural perspective as an exciting language of animal representation. Animals and Their People aims to bridge the gap between Anglo-American and Central European human-animal studies.