Anne Quirynen and Simon Vincent

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Edited by Elizabeth Andersen, Henrike Lähnemann and Anne Simon

The volume explores the hitherto uncharted late medieval religious landscape of Northern Germany, from 13th-century Helfta to the 15th-century Lüneburg convents. The mystical and devotional writing of Northern Germany is contextualised through chapters on the Netherlands, Scandinavia and East Prussia. The seminal influence of the liturgy on these texts and their transmission is revealed in the creative interplay of Latin and Low German. Through the individual chapters and their appendices, which also contain translations into English, the reader can access a wealth of texts produced by communities of religious and lay women who write learnedly in Latin and fervently in Low German. Together, the chapters and appendices reveal a fascinating regional "mystical culture" which also reverberated across Northern Europe.

Contributors include: Jürgen Bärsch, Anne Bollmann, Veerle Fraeters, Ulrike Hascher-Burger, Ernst Hellgardt, Tanja Mattern, Balazs Nemes, Sara S. Poor, Eva Schlotheuber, Almut Suerbaum, and Geert Warnar.

Series:

Edited by Elizabeth Andersen, Henrike Lähnemann and Anne Simon

Series:

Edited by Elizabeth Andersen, Henrike Lähnemann and Anne Simon

Series:

Edited by Elizabeth Andersen, Henrike Lähnemann and Anne Simon

Series:

Edited by Elizabeth Andersen, Henrike Lähnemann and Anne Simon

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Edited by Karin Aijmer and Anne-Marie Simon-Vandenbergen

Building on the first volume in the Studies in Pragmatics series which clearly set out the differences and similarities in approaches to discourse markers, Pragmatic Markers in Contrast continues the debate through offering a unique and thorough examination of the methods and theories for studying pragmatic markers cross-linguistically. As a result of internationalisation and new developments in linguistics there has been an increasing interest in cross-linguistic studies. Aijmer and Simon-Vandenbergen have assembled experts in this field to explore the comparison of pragmatic markers across languages in order to offer important insights into the similarities and differences between languages. Contrastive studies can also shed more light on the pragmatic and discourse functions that pragmatic markers fulfil in the languages compared. Another issue is to what extent pragmatic markers which have evolved from the same lexical source have developed similar functions in different languages. An impressively large number of different approaches are represented in this volume as well as a wide range of languages including; English, Swedish, Spanish, Dutch, German, French, Norwegian and Solv (a dialect of Finland Swedish).