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Author: Anne Suryani

Abstract

This chapter discusses the extent of religious beliefs in influencing students’ motivations for entering teacher education and becoming a teacher, and their perceptions about teaching and career aspirations. The study applies the Factors Influencing Teaching Choice framework (FIT-Choice) (), which was psychometrically validated in the Indonesian context (). Students’ religious beliefs and practices were assessed using the Religious Commitment Inventory (RCI-10) (). Over 800 final-year undergraduate teacher education students participated in the study. Connections between religion and career aspirations were confirmed by differences identified between religious groups. Muslim participants experienced the strongest religious influence to enter teacher education and tended to be more “devout” than Protestant and Catholic participants. Highly religious participants were likely to view teaching as a profession with a high social status and therefore exert more effort into teaching and persist in their careers. Perceptions of teaching as a highly skilled and professional occupation would predict students’ intentions and efforts to improve their knowledge and skills. Current teacher education policies should consider factors influencing teacher education students’ career aspirations, including religious beliefs, perceptions of teaching as requiring high expertise and knowledge, and satisfaction with their choice of profession.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Chapter 4 The Role of Religious Beliefs in Teacher Education Students’ Career Aspirations
Author: Anne Suryani

Abstract

This chapter discusses the extent of religious beliefs in influencing students’ motivations for entering teacher education and becoming a teacher, and their perceptions about teaching and career aspirations. The study applies the Factors Influencing Teaching Choice framework (FIT-Choice) (), which was psychometrically validated in the Indonesian context (). Students’ religious beliefs and practices were assessed using the Religious Commitment Inventory (RCI-10) (). Over 800 final-year undergraduate teacher education students participated in the study. Connections between religion and career aspirations were confirmed by differences identified between religious groups. Muslim participants experienced the strongest religious influence to enter teacher education and tended to be more “devout” than Protestant and Catholic participants. Highly religious participants were likely to view teaching as a profession with a high social status and therefore exert more effort into teaching and persist in their careers. Perceptions of teaching as a highly skilled and professional occupation would predict students’ intentions and efforts to improve their knowledge and skills. Current teacher education policies should consider factors influencing teacher education students’ career aspirations, including religious beliefs, perceptions of teaching as requiring high expertise and knowledge, and satisfaction with their choice of profession.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Part 3 Youth, Schooling, and Social Context of Education
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Part 2 School and Institutional Practices
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
Part 1 Teachers and Teaching
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three key aspects of education in Indonesia: teachers and teaching; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and schooling.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia, (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international benchmarking assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
Chapter 1 Preparing Youth for Indonesia 4.0

Abstract

The introductory chapter recognises firstly the prevalence and uses of the “Indonesia 4.0” discourse in directing attention to whether and how youths in Indonesia are both benefiting and underserved educationally. This chapter frames the studies in the book from a macro perspective of the education system, as contributing to conversations on a range of issues toward preparing Indonesian youth for the envisioned present and future pertaining to: educational participation, quality, and equity; teaching and learning; and youth’s skills and employment. The book highlights cases that emphasise, critique, and delineate progresses, as well as new and persisting challenges. This chapter proposes ways the empirical studies contribute with insights to especially three aspects of the education system: teachers and teaching; programs and curricular offering in education especially at the secondary and tertiary levels; and the social and cultural contexts of education implicating youth’s encounters with schooling and educational experiences. This chapter foregrounds that the case studies bring into their analyses how larger social forces and phenomena—for example, political and education decentralisation, internal rural-urban and transnational migration, and the global feminist and women’s movement—shape and interact with visions of preparing all Indonesian youth for meaningful participation in the society.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth
In: Preparing Indonesian Youth

Abstract

The introductory chapter recognises firstly the prevalence and uses of the “Indonesia 4.0” discourse in directing attention to whether and how youths in Indonesia are both benefiting and underserved educationally. This chapter frames the studies in the book from a macro perspective of the education system, as contributing to conversations on a range of issues toward preparing Indonesian youth for the envisioned present and future pertaining to: educational participation, quality, and equity; teaching and learning; and youth’s skills and employment. The book highlights cases that emphasise, critique, and delineate progresses, as well as new and persisting challenges. This chapter proposes ways the empirical studies contribute with insights to especially three aspects of the education system: teachers and teaching; programs and curricular offering in education especially at the secondary and tertiary levels; and the social and cultural contexts of education implicating youth’s encounters with schooling and educational experiences. This chapter foregrounds that the case studies bring into their analyses how larger social forces and phenomena—for example, political and education decentralisation, internal rural-urban and transnational migration, and the global feminist and women’s movement—shape and interact with visions of preparing all Indonesian youth for meaningful participation in the society.

In: Preparing Indonesian Youth