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In: Global Changes – Local Stages
In: Global Changes – Local Stages
In: Global Changes – Local Stages
In: Global Changes – Local Stages
Author: Anneli Saro

Abstract

The chapter illuminates how the state’s cultural politics on the one hand, and theatre makers or citizens on the other hand have influenced Estonian theatre through censorship, and how theatre has reacted to censorship in different circumstances, e.g. in different political contexts. Censorship has been implemented as a tool of prevention or suspension of scandals, but censorship itself has also been the direct cause of scandals.

This discussion of censorship proceeds from two definitions of scandal: 1) an incident or event that disgraces or damages the reputation of the persons or organization involved, and 2) censure or outrage arising from an action or event. Following the argument of these definitions, it can be stated that censorship is implemented either to prevent disgrace or damage to somebody’s reputation or to cease the process of disgracing and damaging. Borrowing from medical terminology, it can be stated that this chapter, which concerns censorship, deals with the “containment” of potential scandals or “vaccination” against the eruption of potential scandals. One can also find an implicit relationship between censorship and scandal. The word ‘censure’ is closely related to ‘censor’; thus, censorship can be understood as one of the forms of censure or outrage that are quite common reactions to scandals or to expected scandals.

The chapter is divided into four parts according to the historical periods, based on state power:

  1. 1.Czarist Russia (1710–1918),
  2. 2.the (first) Republic of Estonia (1918–1940),
  3. 3.the Soviet Union and German occupation (1940–1991) and
  4. 4.the Republic of Estonia (1991 until the present).

Each period is analysed through similar lenses, thereby evaluating the public, political, moral and artistic aspects of theatre leading to scandals. Some forms of censorship can be observed in all these periods, but in each period, the state authorities considered different issues – political, moral or aesthetic – as scandalous or dangerous. This chapter focuses mainly on the criteria for censorship, i.e. what was considered dangerous or amoral in theatre during these periods, and how these aspects are related to the general cultural and political background of the time.

In: Theatre Scandals
Author: Anneli Saro

Abstract

The chapter illuminates how the state’s cultural politics on the one hand, and theatre makers or citizens on the other hand have influenced Estonian theatre through censorship, and how theatre has reacted to censorship in different circumstances, e.g. in different political contexts. Censorship has been implemented as a tool of prevention or suspension of scandals, but censorship itself has also been the direct cause of scandals.

This discussion of censorship proceeds from two definitions of scandal: 1) an incident or event that disgraces or damages the reputation of the persons or organization involved, and 2) censure or outrage arising from an action or event. Following the argument of these definitions, it can be stated that censorship is implemented either to prevent disgrace or damage to somebody’s reputation or to cease the process of disgracing and damaging. Borrowing from medical terminology, it can be stated that this chapter, which concerns censorship, deals with the “containment” of potential scandals or “vaccination” against the eruption of potential scandals. One can also find an implicit relationship between censorship and scandal. The word ‘censure’ is closely related to ‘censor’; thus, censorship can be understood as one of the forms of censure or outrage that are quite common reactions to scandals or to expected scandals.

The chapter is divided into four parts according to the historical periods, based on state power:

  1. 1.Czarist Russia (1710–1918),
  2. 2.the (first) Republic of Estonia (1918–1940),
  3. 3.the Soviet Union and German occupation (1940–1991) and
  4. 4.the Republic of Estonia (1991 until the present).

Each period is analysed through similar lenses, thereby evaluating the public, political, moral and artistic aspects of theatre leading to scandals. Some forms of censorship can be observed in all these periods, but in each period, the state authorities considered different issues – political, moral or aesthetic – as scandalous or dangerous. This chapter focuses mainly on the criteria for censorship, i.e. what was considered dangerous or amoral in theatre during these periods, and how these aspects are related to the general cultural and political background of the time.

In: Theatre Scandals
Author: Anneli Saro

In this article, two phenomena are investigated together – writing and theatricality – in order to address the following questions: how an every-day phenomenon might become playing and/or even theatrical playing; and what does this particular conception of writing as performing tell us about playing and being human? For this purpose, a series of events staged under the name Literary Saturdays is investigated. The notions of playing, writing as playing, as well as the theatrical potential of writing and reading will be discussed.

An everyday act becomes a play when a certain playful mood prevails that enriches the activity with the pleasure of freedom and creativity. An act becomes theatrical playing when it encompasses the meeting of different parties who accordingly become performers and spectators. The phenomenon Literary Saturdays demonstrates that the scale of cultural and artistic performances is constantly expanding, posing at the same time new theoretical questions that may revise our conceptions of performance.

In: Playing Culture
Author: Anneli Saro

In this article, two phenomena are investigated together – writing and theatricality – in order to address the following questions: how an every-day phenomenon might become playing and/or even theatrical playing; and what does this particular conception of writing as performing tell us about playing and being human? For this purpose, a series of events staged under the name Literary Saturdays is investigated. The notions of playing, writing as playing, as well as the theatrical potential of writing and reading will be discussed.

An everyday act becomes a play when a certain playful mood prevails that enriches the activity with the pleasure of freedom and creativity. An act becomes theatrical playing when it encompasses the meeting of different parties who accordingly become performers and spectators. The phenomenon Literary Saturdays demonstrates that the scale of cultural and artistic performances is constantly expanding, posing at the same time new theoretical questions that may revise our conceptions of performance.

In: Playing Culture
In: Global Changes – Local Stages
In: Global Changes – Local Stages