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The Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies was founded in 1995, basing itself at the Institute of Germanic Studies of the University of London. Professor J.M. Ritchie became Chairman of the Research Centre, whose members are Dr Charmian Brinson, Professor Richard Dove, Dr Marian Malet, Dr Jennifer Taylor and Professor Ian Wallace, with Dr Anthony Grenville as Honorary Secretary.
The aim of the Research Centre is to promote research in the field of German-speaking exiles in Great Britain. To this end it organises conferences and publishes their proceedings, holds research seminars, and publishes its own Yearbook. Its members cooperate in the writing of scholarly studies, including a book about the German-speaking refugees from Hitler in Britain, Home from Home?, and a study of the Austrian Centre in London, 1939-47. Though the Research Centre has primarily concerned itself with the German-speaking refugees from Nazism in Britain, it aims to extend its scope to include German-speaking exiles of other periods and comparable groups such as the Czech refugees from Hitler or Italian anti-Fascists. Given its location near the heart of the principal centre of settlement of the refugees from Germany, the Research Centre readily provides advice and useful contacts to scholars and postgraduates working in the field.
In: ‘Immortal Austria’?
In: The Kindertransport to Britain 1938/39
In: German-speaking Exiles in the Performing Arts in Britain after 1933
In: ‘I didn’t want to float; I wanted to belong to something’
In: Voices from Exile
This volume gives an extensive overview of current developments in the field of archival collections relating to German-speaking refugees located in Germany, Austria, the USA, Ireland and the UK. The contributions illustrate the three interlinked areas of refugee archives, Exile and Migration Studies research and related databases and other resources. The articles investigate their interrelationship as well as the future challenges facing all three areas by focussing on larger archival holdings as well as collections relating to individuals and organisations and more recently established electronic and online resources and finding aids. The volume is aimed at researchers and archival practioners alike and should be especially useful for anyone starting out in the field.
This volume fills an important gap in research on the refugees from Nazism who settled in Britain, by giving a full and wide-ranging account of the organizations that they established. The contributions cover these organizations chronologically, from those that did not outlast the war to those still active today, and in terms of their function, as cultural or religious institutions, as historical resources for the study of Nazism and the refugees, or as all-purpose representative refugee associations. Any scholar or student working in this field needs to have an understanding of the organizations that were and are so characteristic of the refugee community.