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Author: Anthony Squiers
Bertolt Brecht is widely considered one of the most important figures in Twentieth Century literature. While there is a broad corpus of scholarship which analyzes the formalistic elements of Brecht’s work, much of this has been limited by formalistic approaches and has neglected his unique contributions to Marxist philosophy. This book serves to remedy this by reconstructing Brecht’s social and political philosophy into a single theoretical framework for the first time. It presents Brecht’s thought in context of a revolutionary Marxist aesthetic and explores his vision of consciousness as it relates to historical materialism, the dialectic of enlightenment, social ontology, epistemology and ethics. This is accomplished by meticulous readings of his theoretical writings and close analysis of three important plays, The Good Woman of Setzuan, Life of Galileo, and his adaption of Coriolanus. In doing so, this book reveals Brecht’s relevance today for anyone interested in politics and aesthetics.
Author: Anthony Squiers

Abstract

This essay serves as a general introduction to the volume. It contextualizes, problematizes, and theorizes Brecht given the grim realities of our present day. Expounding on Brecht’s idea that dark times call for extraordinary virtues, it explores the importance of the project of philosophizing Brecht now and argues that Brecht offers un-foreclosed and liberating possibilities which are rendered through his willingness to perplex, empiricism and practical attitude toward philosophy.

In: Philosophizing Brecht
Author: Anthony Squiers

Abstract

This essay does two things. First, it provides a framework for understanding Brecht within analytic philosophy by demonstrating how his notion of gestus can position him within philosophical discourse. Second, it provides a case study of Brecht’s adapted story, “Socrates Wounded” using that framework. This case study examines the story in relation to Plato’s accounts of Socrates fighting at the battle of Delium with specific attention to the theme of courage. It finds that while both agree that courage is found in the wisdom to do the morally just action, they disagree on the nature of that wisdom and on what acts can be considered morally justified. It also finds that while both authors insist on a moral imperative to act courageously the respective imperatives have different roots and that the two thinkers disagree as to whether or not one must be steadfast in order to be brave.

In: Philosophizing Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht
In: An Introduction to the Social and Political Philosophy of Bertolt Brecht