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Author: Anti Selart

Discussed is the first part (events from ca.1180-ca.1205) of the Chronicle of Henry of Livonia (written ca. 1224-1227). The chronicle is, even if factually and chronologically mostly correct, an extremely apologetic work. Henry defends the Church of Riga here, toning down its internal conflicts and keeping silent about issues unbecoming to it. Describing the very beginning of the history of the Bishopric of Riga and the military order of the Brethren of the Sword, Henry presents almost only episodes, legitimising the Rigan crusades. According to the chronicle, Riga (and not the King of Denmark, or other counterparts of Riga) had not only all legal, moral and divine authoris ations, but also the historical priority in Christianisation of Livonia.

In: The Medieval Chronicle V
Author: Anti Selart

Discussed is the first part (events from ca.1180-ca.1205) of the Chronicle of Henry of Livonia (written ca. 1224-1227). The chronicle is, even if factually and chronologically mostly correct, an extremely apologetic work. Henry defends the Church of Riga here, toning down its internal conflicts and keeping silent about issues unbecoming to it. Describing the very beginning of the history of the Bishopric of Riga and the military order of the Brethren of the Sword, Henry presents almost only episodes, legitimising the Rigan crusades. According to the chronicle, Riga (and not the King of Denmark, or other counterparts of Riga) had not only all legal, moral and divine authoris ations, but also the historical priority in Christianisation of Livonia.

In: The Medieval Chronicle V
Volume Editor: Anti Selart
The Baltic Crusades in the thirteenth century led to the creation of the medieval Livonia. But what happened after the conquest? The contributors to this volume analyse the cultural, societal, economic and technological changes in the Baltic Sea region c. 1200–1350. The chapters focus on innovations and long-term developments which were important in integrating the area into medieval European society more broadly, while also questioning the traditional divide of the Livonian post-crusade society into native victims and foreign victors. The process of multilateral negotiations and adaptions created a synthesis which was not necessarily an outcome of the wars but also a manifestation of universal innovation processes in northern Europe.
Contributors are Arvi Haak, Tõnno Jonuks, Kristjan Kaljusaar, Ivar Leimus, Christian Lübke, Madis Maasing, Mihkel Mäesalu, Anti Selart, Vija Stikāne, and Andres Tvauri.
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century
In: Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century