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In: Scrinium
In: Scrinium
Author: Anton Pritula

Abstract

As shown in recent studies, East Syriac colophons were rather standardised, at least in the Ottoman period, and they incorporated into the main colophon body not only prose passages, but also poetic ones. The current article discusses one such passage that occurs in both prose and poetic forms in various manuscripts, namely the topos of ‘the five twins that pulled a yoke from the forest through the white field’. It provides a fascinating example of the trope’s transmission over the centuries, as well as the poetic creativity of East Syriac scribes as manifested in the Ottoman period.

In: Aramaic Studies
Author: Anton Pritula

Abstract

The short pieces discussed in the paper were added between larger texts and on the flyleaves by the scribe himself. Thematically, the poems may be divided in two blocks: the first one contains poems on reading, studying grammar, and on the scribal activities, whereas the second one comprises poetry ascribed to Bar ʿEbrōyō on different topics. The manuscript under discussion – Bar ʿEbrōyō’s (1226–1286) Metrical Grammar (DCA 00065) – was written in 1552 by ʿAbdīšōʿ of Gāzartā, an East Syrian patriarch (1555–1570), poet and copyist.

These small pieces forming short verse collections illustrate the complex processes that took place in the manuscript circulation and literary life during the Early Ottoman period. All the short poems were never published or studied before, and for that reason they are placed here in the Appendix in both Syriac original and English translation.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author: Anton Pritula

Abstract

In the modern period, numerous notes appeared within the colophons, aiming to protect a manuscript from potential thieves by addressing various curses to them. Some of those curses obtained a verse form, mainly forming quatrains, the most popular genre form, suitable for various kinds of notes. The paper discusses a such pieces – never studied of published so far – that were composed and written by a scribe named Hōrmīz, son of ‘Abd al-Aḥad, who worked in the early 18th century in Kirkuk (Syriac Bēt Slōk),

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author: Anton Pritula

Abstract

ʿAbdīšōʿ of Gāzartā, the second patriarch (1555-1570) of the East Syriac Uniate (Chaldean) Church, is known as a founder of its literary tradition, and an author of numerous liturgical and non-liturgical poems. He was also active as a scribe, of whose production several manuscripts survive that were never studied before. The present paper discusses them, in particular the historical and autobiographical information that is found in the scribe’s colophons and notes. This information is of a large importance for the history of the Christian communities in early Ottoman time.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author: Anton Pritula

Abstract

The short pieces discussed in the paper were added between larger texts and on the flyleaves by the scribe himself. Thematically, the poems may be divided in two blocks: the first one contains poems on reading, studying grammar, and on the scribal activities, whereas the second one comprises poetry ascribed to Bar ʿEbrōyō on different topics. The manuscript under discussion – Bar ʿEbrōyō’s (1226–1286) Metrical Grammar (DCA 00065) – was written in 1552 by ʿAbdīšōʿ of Gāzartā, an East Syrian patriarch (1555–1570), poet and copyist.

These small pieces forming short verse collections illustrate the complex processes that took place in the manuscript circulation and literary life during the Early Ottoman period. All the short poems were never published or studied before, and for that reason they are placed here in the Appendix in both Syriac original and English translation.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Author: Anton Pritula

Abstract

The Syriac poetry of the 11th–14th centuries (so-called Syriac Renaissance) was studied very purely until quite recently. One of the reasons for such indifference is a traditional approach of the scholars, who treated this poetry as a secondary one, because of a strong influence of the Islamic literature.

In this article, it is argued that the authors of this period were trying to connect their own poetical traditions with the achievements of the Persian and Arabic poetry. As the result, they created new original forms that need to be carefully examined.

One of the creators of this new style was probably Bar ʿEbrōyō (1226–1286), a famous West-Syrian philosopher and scientist. His esthetic approach was developed by his East-Syrian contemporary Khāmīs bar Qardaḥē of Arbela, who used sophisticated rhythmic and rhyme schemes to achieve a stronger expressive effect. The article discusses one of his poems that demonstrates his outstanding skills as a poet experimentalist in both rhythm and rhyming.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
Authors: Anton Pritula and Peter Zieme

Abstract

The text being discussed is found in many manuscripts of the Divan (collection of poems) of an East Syriac poet Khāmīs bar Qardāḥē (late 13th century). The edition demonstrates the discrepancies in rendering glosses in the Turkish stanzas, in contrast to a relative unity of readings in the Syriac ones. To explain these discrepancies, the following pages discuss the lack of consistency in the Turkic Garshuni tradition. In addition, the poem is one of the earliest texts of this group. It should be dated to the period close to the life of Khāmīs, but was not necessarily composed by this poet, since it is absent from the earliest surviving copies. All the Syriac stanzas use quatrains in a 7-7-8-8 meter. Each of them has its own internal rhyme that follows a constant scheme, i.e. in every first, second and and fourth lines of each verse (ааха). In the Turkic stanzas, the verses have an irregular meter that varies from eight to ten syllables. In the Turkic translation of the Syriac original, one finds many syriacisms, such as bar Maryam (the Son of Mary), a stable combination used in the texts. Such a broad use of borrowings, both in vocabulary and syntax, is common for translated religious texts, especially liturgical ones, in which the proximity to the original might have a great importance.

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World