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In: Is There a Text in this Cave? Studies in the Textuality of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Honour of George J. Brooke
Author: Ariel Feldman

This paper analyzes the citation from Exod 34:11–24 in the Qumran scroll 4Q368 2. It explores the variant readings preserved in this quotation and demonstrates that some of them have been influenced by the parallel passages from the book of Deuteronomy.

In: Journal of Ancient Judaism
Author: Ariel Feldman

Qumran Interpretation of the Genesis Flood. Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick, 2015. Pp. xii + 212. Paper. $25. ISBN 978498220095.

The book under review explores the interpretation of the Genesis Flood story in several texts found among the Dead Sea Scrolls. Since this topic has been taken up by several earlier studies, the author wishes to make a new contribution by focusing on the depiction of the Flood, rather than the figure of Noah, in four texts: 1QapGen, 4Q252, 4Q370, and 4Q422. Instead of providing yet another “survey of Qumran manuscripts dealing with (or alluding to) the Flood,” he

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Ariel Feldman

Elisha Qimron, The Dead Sea Scrolls: The Hebrew Writings. Vol. 3: Between Bible and Mishnah. Jerusalem: Yad Ben-Zvi, 2014 [Hebrew]. Hardback. ISBN 9789652173775.

This is the third and final fascicle of Elisha Qimron’s new edition of the Hebrew scrolls found in the caves of Qumran. Featuring fragments from some 160 scrolls, this volume continues with the format adopted in the previous two. Each text is preceded by a brief introduction, often a single line pointing to the DJD volume where the text was initially published. Next comes the Hebrew text with an apparatus elaborating

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

Abstract

This contribution is the first attempt at deciphering a miniature opistograph 4Q148 included in Józef T. Milik’s DJD 6 edition of tefillin and mezuzot from Qumran Cave 4. It proposes that the partially folded recto of this tiny fragment contains a non- scriptural text. A handful of legible words may suggest a prayer. Its verso, inscribed by a different hand, appears to be a legal text, evoking monetary amounts, perhaps related to inheritance. Folded and fastened similarly to tefillin, 4Q148 might have been a legal document re-used to produce an amulet.

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
Author: Ariel Feldman

Abstract

This note suggests a new reading and reconstruction of the oft-cited 11QMelchizedek 2:6–8. This passage is a part of the “pesher for the last days” expounding on Lev 25:13 and Deut 15:2. Its vision of future liberation from spiritual captivity to Belial relies on the language and conceptual framework of the Jubilee Year. Moreover, the pesher refers to a temporal scheme of ten Jubilees. The new reading helps clarify the precise timing of the eschatological redemption, “the beginning of the first Jubilee after [the] te[n] Jubilees,” and its implication for the scroll’s scriptural exegesis.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Ariel Feldman

Isaac Kalimi, (2017) Fighting over the Bible: Jewish Interpretation, Sectarianism and Polemic from Temple to Talmud and Beyond. The Brill Reference Library of Judaism 54. Leiden, Boston: Brill. Hbk. $159.00. ISBN: 9789004339101.

The volume under review brings together ten essays by Isaac Kalimi. Most of them were published elsewhere in either English or German. The articles deal with an impressive array of topics and texts, predominantly pertaining to rabbinic Judaism.

The volume opens with a brief overview of some of the main sources to be explored and a gist of the chapters to follow. Somewhat unexpectedly

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology
Author: Ariel Feldman

Abstract

This paper explores the reworking of the biblical Sinai accounts in 4Q377 3 ii. While previous studies of 4Q377 focused on its depiction of Moses, the retelling of the Sinai theophany in this scroll has not received due attention. The paper scrutinizes the intricate web of biblical allusions in 4Q377 3 ii and analyzes the ways in which it deals with the difficulties embedded in the accounts of the Sinai revelation in Exodus and Deuteronomy. It demonstrates that the scroll’s interpretation of these biblical texts exhibits several similarities with the later Jewish sources.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries