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In: From Lanka Eastwards
A New Edition with Translation and Commentary
Author: Arlo Griffiths
This work presents a new edition of two kāṇḍas ("books") of the Paippalādasaṃhitā, generally considered to be among the most important Vedic texts, yet still only partially available in published form. In so doing, it aims to provide a model for future first and new editions of other kāṇḍas. The edition constituted in this work is a new edition, that constitutes a major improvement on the editio princeps, including dozens of improved readings, providing a more methodical presentation of the transmitted manuscript evidence, and based on a more representative sample of manuscripts. General editorial deliberations are laid down in an elaborate Introduction, which explains and justifies the methodology that has been adopted; specific editorial problems are addressed in an elaborate philological commentary. All passages edited or cited in the commentary have been translated. The work is completed with a complete index verborum to the two edited kāṇḍas and an index locorum of Paippalādasaṃhitā passages cited in the commentary.
Author: Arlo Griffiths

Abstract

It is a well-known fact that Sanskrit had a relatively shorter and less prolific lifespan in the epigraphy of Indonesia, particularly in the Javanese epigraphic record, than in that of other Southeast Asian regions. All the more precious, therefore, are the rare opportunities to add a Sanskrit inscription to the historical record of Java and learn more of how the Sanskrit language was deployed on the island to represent events recorded for posterity. In this article, I offer my edition and interpretation of the inscription referred to in Indonesian publications as Prasasti Sankhara (sic, with kh), that is, the Inscription of Śaṅkara; debunk the entirely unfounded interpretation which it has received in successive reprints and editions of the greatly influential Sejarah nasional Indonesia (National history of Indonesia); and show the real historical interest of this inscription.

Open Access
Author: Arlo Griffiths

This article present the epigraphical collection of Museum Ranggawarsita, the provincial museum of Central Java province, in Semarang. Some of these were entirely unstudied, others had been published only in inaccessible media, and yet others had been reported when they were still in situ, without any reading or translation being offered. Several belong to the important assemblage of probably 7th century inscriptions from sites at the Javanese north coast in Batang regency that are of particular importance for understanding the genesis of early ‘Indianized’ polities in Central Java.

Open Access
Texts, Language and Ritual
Volume Editors: Jan Houben and Arlo Griffiths
Based on papers from the Third International Vedic Workshop, held in Leiden in 2002, this volume explores the texts, language and ritual of the The Vedas – one of the oldest elaborate corpuses of texts in any human language. The research presented not only shares a common subject area viz. Vedic texts and the language and ritual reflected in these, but also in acceptance of the importance of the philological method in dealing with these texts, where possible supplemented by what is now known as “Vedic fieldwork” – the study of Vedic rituals in South Asia who continue and renew the ritual tradition in which they were born.

The paper calls the attention of Javanists, and Indonesianists at large, to theoretical as well as practical issues connected with conventions for the Romanisation of Old Javanese, Old Malay, Old Sundanese and other Indonesian languages which were traditionally written in Indic scripts, and underscores the difference between transliteration, on the one hand, and transcription or orthography (‘spelling’) on the other. In doing so, it replies to the points of criticism raised by Dick van der Meij in his review (2012) of From Laṅkā Eastwards, edited by Acri, Creese & Griffiths (2011).

Open Access
In: Indo-Iranian Journal

The string of territories called Campā, lying in what is today Vietnam, has yielded about two hundred and fifty inscriptions spanning over ten centuries, from ca. 400 well into the fifteenth century ce. These inscriptions have not yet drawn much attention from the point of view of the shared religious history of South and Southeast Asia. In the present contribution, we focus on a group of seven short Sanskrit inscriptions issued by a king named Prakāśadharman-Vikrāntavarman who ruled in the seventh century. A careful reading of these texts, in parallel with related Sanskrit texts from South Asia, reveals something of the intellectual and religious cosmopolis of which the poets behind these inscriptions were a part, suggesting for instance that tantric Śaiva scriptures had reached Campā by the late seventh century.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
In: From Lanka Eastwards
In: From Lanka Eastwards