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  • Author or Editor: Astrid Dröse x
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Using paradigms of more recent research on cultural transfer, this study examines Schiller’s Shakespeare-reception in the context of the “saddle” period of “Shakespeare-mania.” The focus here is on Schiller’s reworking of Macbeth which sought to demonstrate the compatibility and confluence of the Ancients and the Moderns in what can be called a “poetics of hybridity”; that is, the mastering and ennobling of Shakespeare through the process of making the tragedy more like that of the Ancients. This process of transformation was, in fact, a programmatic trait of the Classical Schiller, for which his Macbeth-adaptation provides a paradigmatic example. Especially relevant are Schiller’s reworking of the witches’ szenes, to which contemporary critics immediately reacted. His reworking of the scenes deviated markedly from previous German versions by Chr. M.Wieland, G.A. Bürger, and J.J. Eschenburg in terms of choreography, costumes, form and content. The detailed analysis of these transformations here underscores the poetological-aesthetic signficance of Schiller’s adaptation.

In: Shakespeare as German Author
Author:

Abstract

Using paradigms of more recent research on cultural transfer, this study examines Schiller’s Shakespeare-reception in the context of the “saddle” period of “Shakespeare-mania.” The focus here is on Schiller’s reworking of Macbeth which sought to demonstrate the compatibility and confluence of the Ancients and the Moderns in what can be called a “poetics of hybridity”; that is, the mastering and ennobling of Shakespeare through the process of making the tragedy more like that of the Ancients. This process of transformation was, in fact, a programmatic trait of the Classical Schiller, for which his Macbeth-adaptation provides a paradigmatic example. Especially relevant are Schiller’s reworking of the witches’ szenes, to which contemporary critics immediately reacted. His reworking of the scenes deviated markedly from previous German versions by Chr. M.Wieland, G.A. Bürger, and J.J. Eschenburg in terms of choreography, costumes, form and content. The detailed analysis of these transformations here underscores the poetological-aesthetic signficance of Schiller’s adaptation.

In: Shakespeare as German Author
In: Johann Elias Schlegel und das Theater
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Abstract

This article focuses on Opitz’s well-known song “Ach Liebste/ laß vns eilen” and its intercultural contexts. While so far mainly ancient texts (Horace/ carpe-diem motif) as well as sonnets and odes of Ronsard have been analyzed as models and intertextual references, the author here examines the Air de Cour “Ma belle je vous prie” by the French composer Gabriel Bataille as a model. The analysis shows that Opitz, although clearly oriented on the French Air, makes decisive translational changes: Opitz translates the courtly semantics of time of the Air into a typically Protestant-bourgeois vocabulary reflecting temporal acceleration and economization.

In: Daphnis
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Abstract

Luise Gottsched’s comedy The Testament, first published in Die Deutsche Schaubühne (Vol VI, 1745), was a successful stage play in the middle of the 18th century – despite Lessing’s criticism. It is also controversally discussed in research: Some regard the drama as a classic example of Saxon type comedy („Sächsische Typenkomödie“), while feminist research has interpreted it as a subversive protest play. Allegedly, Luise rebelled against her husband’s authority here. This article concentrates from a comparative perspective on the intertextual Molière references of the comedy and places the drama in its social and historical context. As a result, The Testament can be seen as a German „Lustspiel“ that combines the traditions of European comedy in a virtuoso manner and at the same time presents an ambivalent plea for female enlightenment.

In: Artes
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This article outlines the status, tasks, and desiderata of research on the song of the early modern period. The starting point of the contribution is Adorno’s rejection of the Lied from an ideology-critical and autonomy-aesthetic point of view. In the post-war period, this had consequences for research on the Lied as well as for the social treatment of this form. On the other hand, national-philological perspectives continued to dominate for a long time; at the same time, the song (Lied) was not only neglected in research, but also the singing of songs became suspect and was increasingly rejected in music didactics. Only new discussions, first about terminology (Musikalische Lyrik, Danuser 2004), have made the song attractive again. Recent research has focused on aspects such as translation, mobility, social history, and praxeology. Using examples of early modern song authors like Heinrich Müller, Heinrich Albert, Martin Opitz, and especially Johann Rist, this essay presents these new perspectives.

In: Artes
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Abstract

This article is dedicated to the Leipzig Ovid translator and song poet Johann Georg Schoch. It focusses on Schoch’s major work Neu-erbaueter Poetischer Lust- u[nd] Blumen-Garten (1660). The article analyses the poetics and social references of this collection. The author argues that the bucolic, erotic, and sociable songs are linked by intertextual references to works by other Leipzig authors such as Paul Fleming and Gottfried Finckelthaus. Schoch’s contrafactum of an ode by his student friend David Schirmer (“Immer hin/ fahr immer hin”) shows that the songs function as a keepsake of remembrance and identify both authors as members of a local group. They also provide insights into the social practice of student sociability.

In: Daphnis