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Im Zusammenhang mit der niederländischen reformierten Theologie und Philosophie des 17. Jahrhunderts
Author: Aza Goudriaan
This volume deals with basic questions regarding the philosophical knowledge of God in Suárez and Descartes, two very different, but historically linked early-modern philosophers. It has two parts devoted to Suárez and Descartes respectively. Each section examines the path along which philosophy can acquire knowledge of God, the adequacy which is ascribed to this knowledge, as well as selected topics of the doctrine of God's attributes.
Special attention has been given to both critical and positive reactions to Suárez and Descartes on the part of seventeenth-century Dutch Reformed theologians.
The author argues that Descartes, in comparison with Suárez, reduced the theological interests of philosophy and also limited the starting points for attaining to a philosophical knowledge of God. On the other hand, Descartes elevated the presumed adequacy of this knowledge.
Gisbertus Voetius, Petrus van Mastricht, and Anthonius Driessen
Author: Aza Goudriaan
This book examines the thinking of several Reformed theologians on theological issues that are, historically or by content, related to philosophy.
Three Dutch authors from successive generations are considered in particular: Gisbertus Voetius (1589-1676), Petrus van Mastricht (1630-1706), and Anthonius Driessen (1684-1748). A diversity of issues in Christian doctrine is discussed. These include the relationship between theology and philosophy, creation, Divine providence, the human being, and Divine and natural law.
By reconstructing the views of these three theologians, this book highlights similarities and differences within Reformed orthodoxy, both in doctrine and in relation to philosophy. The changes that thus become visible also suggest that biblical Christianity outlives the philosophical apparatus by whose assistence it is explained.
Editor: Aza Goudriaan
This volume presents early criticisms of Descartes’ philosophy by Dutch Reformed theologian Jacobus Revius (1586-1658).
The book offers the Latin texts—originally printed in 1647—of five theological disputations held at the States College in Leiden, and of Revius’ work Methodi cartesianae consideratio theologica. The texts are preceded by an introduction. Earlier references to Descartes in Revius’ Suarez repurgatus (1643/4) are appended.
This edition makes available theological texts of a remarkable quality. Documenting his argument carefully from various writings of Descartes, Revius seeks especially to indicate where Cartesian philosophy is not consonant with Christian (Reformed) religion or where it is inconsistent. Various indexes enhance the usefulness of the edition.
Author: Aza Goudriaan

This article considers how Athanasius of Alexandria was read by Reformed Protestants of the early modern period. Attention is given to anthologies of patristic material, to John Calvin, Reiner Bachoff (Bachofius), and his Catechesis religionis christianae (1603), Abraham Scultetus’s Medulla theologiae patrum (1606), and Amandus Polanus of Polansdorf’s Symphonia catholica (1607, 1612). The latter three works provide evidence of a direct acquaintance with Athanasius’s writings. Though in comparison with other patristic quotations the Athanasian citations contained in them are in number rather limited, they do come from a broad range of Athanasius’s writings. The references are further not limited to Christology, but deal with a variety of themes relevant to Reformed theology.

In: Church History and Religious Culture
Author: Aza Goudriaan

In a doctoral dissertation De recta ratiocinatione (1686), Gisbert Wessel Duker claimed that “the divinity of Scripture cannot be demonstrated except by reason.” During the promotion session at the University of Franeker, the legal scholar Ulrik Huber (1636–1694) objected to this statement by reading from a copy of the Institutes he had in hand what John Calvin had written about the necessity of the testimony of the Holy Spirit. This article traces Huber’s use of Calvin in various writings published during the ensuing controversy, most notably the De concursu rationis et Sacrae Scripturae (1687). That Huber used him as an authority is significant because he was a legal scholar, and not a theologian, who appealed to Calvin in support of the need for the Holy Spirit and for humble piety in order to counter tendencies in the (legal) philosophy and theology of his day to grant natural human reason a normative status in religion.

In: Church History and Religious Culture
In: Scholasticism Reformed
In: Philosophische Gotteserkenntnis bei Suárez und Descartes
In: Philosophische Gotteserkenntnis bei Suárez und Descartes
In: Philosophische Gotteserkenntnis bei Suárez und Descartes