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Baingio Pinna

This work explores phenomenologically a new research perspective, whose purpose is to answer the question ‘why are paintings painted as they are?’. This perspective is based on the pictorial reproduction task aimed to reveal how subjects of different ages copy/paint what they perceived and how they organize the visual raw material. The results demonstrated the emergence of visual singularities organized in at least four stages going from 4 to 18 years of age reflecting different artistic styles and accomplishments appeared during the history of art. These outcomes entail that the answer to the previous basic question is: ‘we paint what and the way we paint because we perceive what and the way we perceive’ (painting–perception coupling). On the basis of these results, it is suggested that children’s drawings can significantly contribute to the comprehension and explanation of the painting–perception coupling.

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Baingio Pinna

This volume is a collection of articles which explore the relations between modern and classical visual art on the one hand and what is currently known or believed about visual perception, visual exploration, the eye, and the visual brain. The book includes speculative as well as firmly-grounded theories and approaches.
Articles have been chosen for their scholarly value, their scientific approach as far as possible, and their intrinsic interest.
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Baingio Pinna

This volume is a collection of articles which explore the relations between modern and classical visual art on the one hand and what is currently known or believed about visual perception, visual exploration, the eye, and the visual brain. The book includes speculative as well as firmly-grounded theories and approaches.
Articles have been chosen for their scholarly value, their scientific approach as far as possible, and their intrinsic interest.
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Baingio Pinna

Abstract

The psychophysical methods were developed by Fechner to find out the perceptual threshold of a stimulus, that is, the weakest stimulus that could be perceived. In spite of the strong efficiency in measuring thresholds, psychophysics does not help to define the multiplicity and complexity of possible percepts emerging from the same stimulus conditions, and accordingly, of what we perceive. In order to define what we perceive it is also necessary to define what we can perceive within the multiplicity of possible visual outcomes and how they are reciprocally organized. Usually the main experimental task is aimed at focusing on the specific attribute to be measured: what comes before psychophysics, i.e., the phenomenological exploration, is typically not fully investigated either epistemologically or phenomenally, even if it assumes a basic role in the process of scientific discovery. In this work, the importance of the traditional approach is not denied. Our main purpose is to place the two approaches side by side so that they complement each other: the phenomenological exploration complements the quantitative psychophysical measurement of the qualities that emerge through the preliminary exploration. To demonstrate the basic role played by the phenomenological exploration in complementing the psychophysical investigation we introduce three critical visual conditions, called visual gradient of perceptibility, perceptible invisibility and visual levels of perceptibility. Through these conditions several new illusions are studied and some phenomenological rules are suggested.

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Edited by Baingio Pinna

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Color, Line, and Space

The Neuroscience of Spatio-Chromatic Vision

Baingio Pinna

This collection of papers by leading researchers in vision science deals with the role of color in spatial vision and the emergent spatio-chromatic properties within visual scenes.

Several fascinating phenomena are studied through psychophysical experiments and explained in terms of neural and computational models. Topics include: prior adaptation to blurry images, chromatic induction, the influence of color contrast on shape perception, Fechner-Benham subjective color, a novel filling-in effect – dynamic texture spreading, the watercolor illusion, and new illusions based on chromatic variations of the luminance profile across the boundaries.